University of Victoria Legacy Art Galleries

Downtown

PRAXIS

PRAXIS: Studio/Classroom

Current work by art educators from the University of Victoria

January 16 to February 6, 2016

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

630 Yates Street

In this first exhibition of 2016 at the Legacy Art Gallery Downtown, art educators from the University of Victoria’s Faculty of Education present a diverse range of current work, including ceramics, digital art, sculpture, painting, drawing, photography and video.

Committed to collaboration, exchange and annual group exhibitions, these artists/educators recognize the research value of studio practice where the interdependence of teaching and creative production each inform and enhance the other. Drawing upon diverse personal and professional experiences and inspirations, the exhibition of their creative production represents an exciting array of ideas, imagery and processes.

Opening Reception

Saturday, January 16, 2-4pm

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

630 Yates Street

Join us to meet the artists and for light refreshments.

Image Michael J. Emme with New Muses, Don Bergland.

Campus

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Celebrating W.B. Yeats at 150

August 22, extended to February 14, 2016

Curated by the University of Victoria's Special Collections and Archives staff

Legacy Maltwood (at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

2015 marks 150 years since the birth of Irish poet and Nobel laureate William Butler Yeats. This exhibit explores Yeats’ work as a poet and playwright with artwork, rare books, and printed ephemera drawn from the Legacy Gallery and Special Collections and University Archives. The exhibition also features unique items documenting the artistry of his family, including father John Butler Yeats, brother Jack Butler Yeats, and sisters Susan Mary Yeats (Lily) and Elizabeth Corbet Yeats (Lollie), all of whom were noted artists.


Yeats 2015 Facebook Page /// Offical Yeats 2015 Site

Closing Reception

The Legacy of W.B. Yeats

Join CBC Host and UVic Chancellor Shelagh Rogers for a panel discussion exploring the enduring legacy of Irish poet W.B. Yeats.

Thursday, January 28th, 4pm-5:30pm
Room 129 Mearns Centre for Learning– McPherson Library
On the University of Victoria CAMPUS

Free & open to the public.

This event is the closing reception for the Celebrating Yeats at 150 exhibition at the Legacy Maltwood Gallery.

Image Exhibition Poster. Portrait of W.B. Yeats by his brother Jack Yeats from Mosada: A Dramatic Poem (Dublin: Printed by Scaly, Bryers and Walker, 1886).

Natural | Supernatural

Natural | Supernatural

Nuu-chah-nulth Serigraph Prints from the University of Victoria's Permanent Collection

Curated by Allison Grey Noble and Caroline Riedel

First Peoples House

For hours & location click here

This exhibition of serigraph prints by artists Patrick Amos, Joe David, Ron Hamilton (Chuuchkamalthnii), Tim Paul, Art Thompson (Tsa-Qwass-Upp), and Glen Webster visually articulates knowledges of histories and stories that are important to the people of the Nuu-chah-nulth nations. These prints are from the university's permanent collection and originate from the print making studio of Vincent Rickard, who worked with these artists in the 1980s and 1990s. Rickard and donors George and Christiane Smyth have given the university nearly 3,000 contemporary Northwest Coast prints, making UVic's collection the most comprehensive in Canada.

Image: Supernatural, Joe David (Nuu-chah-nulth)

Upcoming

COURTINGRAVENS

Emerging Through the Fog

Tsa-qwa-supp and Tlehpik – Together

February 13, to May 28, 2016

Curated by Hjalmer Wenstob | With supervisory guidance from Williams Legacy Chair, Dr. Carolyn Butler-Palmer

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

630 Yates Street

This is an exhibition of two Nuu-chah-nulth men, “Fog-God” Art Thompson from Ditidaht (1948-2003) and Hjalmer Wenstob from Tla-o-qui-aht. Two artists, two friends. Two lives together.

Featuring the prints and paintings of Art Thompson/Tsa-qwa-supp from the collection of the Legacy Art Galleries and interactive carvings by contemporary artist Hjalmer Wenstob/Tlehpik, whose work is inspired by and resonates with that of his teacher and friend Tsa-qwa-supp. Tsa-qwa-supp taught for many years and inspired a number of artists who continue his work in this day.

Emerging Through The Fog seeks to honour and commemorate the life and work of the dedicated teacher Tsa-qwa-supp on the occasion of Tlehpik’s B.F.A from the University of Victoria’s Visual Arts Department. We invite you to join us in celebrating the life of Tsa-qwa-supp, an inspiring and caring teacher.


Image Courting Ravens, Art Thompson, 1990.

NewBookHistories

New Book Histories

Publishers, Printers and Presses

February 19, 2016 to May 16, 2016

This exhibition is curated by the students in English 500 (Textual Studies and Methods of Research), under the supervision of instructor Dr. Janelle Jenstad.

Legacy Maltwood (at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

Book histories often focus on authors and readers. Yet publishers and printers play key roles in both the art and business of book production. This includes the material form and aesthetics of the book, the acquisition of rights, the shaping of the text, editorial history, and canon formation. Showcasing materials from the University of Victoria Special Collections and University Archives, this exhibition traces the role of publishers and printers in literary history from early production in scriptoria to 21st-century BC small presses. Come learn how early publishers remade the codex in the sixteenth century, who owned and regulated the right to print, how 18th-century printers made Shakespeare, what drove Dickens to become his own publisher, how Lady Chatterley’s Lover escaped the censors, why serial publication mattered, and how literary archives shed light on relationships between publishers and authors.

Image Metal type, Special Collections and University Archives, UVic Libraries, photograph by John Frederick.

Events & Programs

CityTalks2016

The City Talks

A Distinguished Lecture Series Sponsored by the University of Victoria’s Committee for Urban Studies

A Public Dialogue about the Prospects and Challenges of Cities.
The City Talks is a free public speakers' series featuring distinguished urbanists drawn from our own university as well as from outside Victoria. During the 2015-16 academic year, we will hold six sessions at the Legacy Art Gallery in downtown Victoria. The Spring 2016 series of The City Talks will explore the theme of "The Refugee Crisis and the Sanctuary City."

Each presentation begins at 7:30pm. Admission is free of charge and open to the public.



Spring 2016 | The Refugee Crisis and the Sanctuary City


Sanctuary City: Dismantling the State?

Thursday, January 21 | Doors 7pm | 7:30 Start

Free & open to the public.

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

630 Yates Street

Jen Bagelman Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Geography, University of Victoria.
Harsha Walia Social justice activist, journalist, and co-founder of the Vancouver chapter of No One Is Illegal.

The term ‘sanctuary’ often conjures images of a sacred, secured, and contained space. However, in the context of a growing refugee crisis, we are witnessing the emergence of a more expansive grassroots effort to establish entire cities as a place for sanctuary. This session begins with Jennifer Bagelman briefly examining the UK-based sanctuary movement with a focus on Glasgow, host to the largest population of asylum seekers in the UK. Harsha Walia will lead the remainder of the session, addressing the following question: How can calls for a sanctuary city strengthen social movements and increase freedom rather than reinforce the myth of Canadian multiculturalism and state control over the lives of nonstatus migrants and all those living with precarious status?


Cities of Refuge

Thursday, February 25 | Doors 7pm | 7:30 Start

Free & open to the public.

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

630 Yates Street

Alison Mountz, Professor and Canada Research Chair in Global Migration, Department of Geography, Wilfrid Laurier University and Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies, Harvard University.

Cities of Refuge

Alison Mountz is a Professor of Geography at Wilfrid Laurier University. She is a political, urban, and feminist geographer, and a lover of cities. She researches migration, borders, displacement, asylum-seeking, detention, and the ways that these movements change landscapes of home and belonging. She is the author of Seeking Asylum: Human Smuggling and Bureaucracy at the Border (University of Minnesota), which was awarded the 2011 Meridian Book Prize from the Association of American Geographers. Mountz is currently the William Lyon Mackenzie King Visiting Professor of Canadian Studies at Harvard University.

Cities have historically played a key role in providing refuge for those seeking protection and sanctuary from conflict and militarism. Today, in Canada, Germany, the United States, and beyond, cities have become key sites of refuge for the newly displaced. Mining the depth of past meanings of refuge offers important lessons for the present and future. By refuge, I refer not only to formal ideas— refugees being resettled, asylum seekers seeking protection, war resisters forging safe haven, or sanctuary cities as harbingers for those without legal status—although these are all important. I refer more inclusively and hopefully to refuge-seeking of all kinds. People travel to cities in search of work, shelter, community, recognition, difference, or even escape. This coming into something, the search for recognition, the desire to be seen and part of something, signals many of the reasons why people migrate to cities. This talk explores the potential of all cities to be and become sites of refuge.

Rethinking No Man's Land: Sanctuaries in the Urban Dead Zone

Thursday, April 7 | Doors 7pm | 7:30 Start

Free & open to the public.

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

630 Yates Street

Noam Leshem, Lecturer, Department of Geography, Durham University.

Rethinking No Man's Land: Sanctuaries in the Urban Dead Zone

Abstract TBA

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Closing Reception

The Legacy of W.B. Yeats

Join CBC Host and UVic Chancellor Shelagh Rogers for a panel discussion exploring the enduring legacy of Irish poet W.B. Yeats.

Thursday, January 28th, 4pm-5:30pm
Room 129 Mearns Centre for Learning– McPherson Library
On the University of Victoria CAMPUS

Free & open to the public.

This event is the closing reception for the Celebrating Yeats at 150 exhibition at the Legacy Maltwood Gallery.

Panelists: Dr. Ann Saddlemyer (Professor Emeritus, University of Toronto), Dr. Magda Kay (English Department, UVic), and Linda Hardy (Theatre Department, UVic)
Moderator: Shelagh Rogers, host of CBC Radio One's The Next Chapter and Chancellor, University of Victoria Representative from UVic Libraries: Lara Wilson, Director of Special Collections and University Archivist.

Unravelling the Code(x): Book History Event

From Snippets to Series: Historical Writing and the Book Historians

With Dr. Leslie Howsam, Distinguished University Professor Emerita, University of Windsor.

Thursday, February 18th, 4pm
Room A00, Lower level Mearns Centre for Learning– McPherson Library
On the University of Victoria CAMPUS

Free & open to the public.

In the 19th and 20th-century British world, readers received a remarkable amount of historical knowledge in the form of newspaper snippets, reviews in journals, and brief magazine articles – more than from the multi-volume series to which professional historians were oriented. As with other literary and material genres such as novels and scientific works, the pressures of the marketplace and the exigencies of the book, periodical and newspaper trades did much to shape historical writing. This talk will explore the challenge of incorporating accounts of the past into book history, by using the genre to critique both well-worn and novel theories in our field of study. Such models include the communication circuit, the cultural predicament, and the situated knowledges that happen when books travel and transform within multiple and various societies and cultures. The talk will also address the daunting challenge of how to capture a good bibliographical sense of what was published, by whom and where – and consider how relational databases or data-mining might help us to structure and visualize the historiographical/bibliographical networks made up of readers, books, publishers, periodicals, and authors.
This event is part of a SSHRC-supported speaker series Unravelling the Code(x): History of the Book, an interdisciplinary series that explores book history scholarship and the creation, circulation, and reception of knowledge.

Workshop with Dr. Leslie Howsam: Thinking Through the History of the Book at 2:00pm, room A003

Education

Exhibitions at UVic’s Legacy Art Galleries Available as Teaching Resource

Exhibitions at UVic’s Legacy Art Galleries Available as Teaching Resource Legacy announces its exhibition and program season and invites faculty to consider including visits to the galleries as part of cross-disciplinary classroom learning opportunities or as part of assignments. With venues on campus (Legacy Maltwood in the Mearns Centre for Learning) and downtown (Legacy Art Gallery) the Legacy program is varied. Class tours, lectures and research visits can also be arranged with notice.

To view the PDF with the information for the 2015-16 season click here

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Perpetual Salish:

Coast Salish Art in the Classroom

Perpetual Salish: Coast Salish Art in the Classroom is an online resource for teachers, offering cross-curricular lesson plans to engage students and facilitate their understanding of Coast Salish culture and art.

This site is based on the exhibition Perpetual Salish: Contemporary Coast Salish Art from the Salish Weave Collection, curated by Coast Salish artist lessLIE, and originally presented at the University of Victoria's Legacy Art Gallery Downtown (August 15, 2014 - January 10, 2015). The Legacy presented tours of the exhibition for grade four classes to educate the students about Coast Salish art and culture. Coast Salish Art in the Classroom aims to bring this educational initiative to a broader audience.

Click here to visit the website Coast Salish Art in the Classroom

Image wHOle W(((h)))orl(((d))) - lessLIE, Serigraph on paper, 2014

Closure

The Legacy Art Gallery Downtown will be Closed for Installation February 10-12.
Reopening February 19, 2016

Upcoming Exhibition:
Emerging Through the Fog:Tsa-qwa-supp and Tlehpik – Together

February 13, to May 28, 2016

More information here


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