University of Victoria Legacy Art Galleries

Downtown

INDEFIANCE

IN DEFIANCE

Artist/collaborator -
Lindsay Delaronde

October 8, 2016 to January 7, 2017

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

630 Yates Street

The exhibition premiering at the University of Victoria's Legacy Art Gallery Downtown, IN DEFIANCE emerges from Iroquois Mohawk artist Lindsay Delaronde's photographic project entitled Squaw. This project, in utter defiance to that negative word long often used to denigrate Indigenous women, seeks to break down the stereotypes. These individual portraits dismantle the negative stereotypes of First Nations women by allowing the individuals to portray themselves more authentically reflecting truth of diversity, power, and respect.

Celebration Event
Friday October 21, 7-9 pm *Food + Light Refreshments Provided

In Conversation with Lindsay Delaronde & Sarah Hunt
Saturday, October 22, 2-4 pm *Light Refreshments Provided

This event was recorded - to watch the video, click here

Mask Making with Lindsay Delaronde
Sunday, Nov 6, 2016 1-4 pm

Cornhusk Doll Making with Lindsay Delaronde
Sunday, Nov 20, 2016 1-4 pm

More info

Image credit: Lindsay Delaronde, Kelly Aguirre.

WITH GENEROUS SUPPORT FROM:
BCARTSCOUNCIL

INDEFIANCE

The Averted Eye Sees

The Life and Work of Glenn Howarth – Part II

October 15, 2016 to January 7, 2017

Curated by Jenelle Pasiechnik (UVic MA, 2015)
With supervision from Caroline Riedel (Legacy Art Galleries)

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

630 Yates Street

Glenn Howarth was a pillar in Victoria’s arts scene from the late 1970s until his death in 2009. He also had an enduring connection to the University of Victoria -- as a Visual Arts student in the 1960s, a sessional instructor, an artist-in-residence with the Engineering Department, and recently with a bequest of his archival papers and digital art. Howarth was an innovative creator and inspired teacher searching for ways to communicate the artistic process and the perceptual functions of the eye and brain that contribute to visual perception. His work was often infused with surrealistic imagery which recalls the work of Francis Bacon. Howarth was also responsible for innovations in computer graphic art in the early 1980s working on the Telidon system as an artist in residence at UVic’s Engineering Department with Dr. Ernest Chang. He represented Canada with this work in the Sao Paulo Biennale and at Expo 86.

The Averted Eye Sees draws on UVic's significant collection of Howarth paintings primarily from the Michael C. Williams estate, as well as Howarth’s writing, sketches, ephemera, and digital archive, part of the regional artists archive initiative of UVic Libraries Special Collections and Archives. It also includes a fascinating case study on the challenges of ‘retro-computing’ in recreating Howarth’s early experiments in digital artwork.

Due to the popularity of the exhibition on campus this summer, a second edition of this exhibition will be featured in the small gallery downtown, allowing for the viewing of a larger selection of Howarth’s powerful oeuvre.

Campus

Continuance

Continuance

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Theories of Organic Architecture in the Designs of Samuel Maclure and John DiCastri

November 5, 2016 to January 29, 2017

Curated by Josie Greenhill (Art History and Visual Studies) with supervision by Caroline Riedel and Mary Jo Hughes (Legacy Art Galleries)

Legacy Maltwood (at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

Local architects Samuel Maclure (1860-1929) and John Di Castri (1924-2005) shaped Victoria’s cityscape in distinct ways and their structures reflect two very different eras and design aesthetics in our city’s history. This exhibition compares selected designs by Di Castri and Maclure and compares them to the theories of organic architecture articulated by world –renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Through a careful selection of architectural commissions, this exhibition demonstrates the similar aesthetics and philosophies shared by all three architects.

Image credit: Exhibtion Poster - Architect: John Di Castri, Dunsmuir Residence Interior, 1951.

Natural | Supernatural

Natural | Supernatural

Nuu-chah-nulth Serigraph Prints from the University of Victoria's Permanent Collection

Curated by Allison Grey Noble and Caroline Riedel

First Peoples House

For hours & location click here

This exhibition of serigraph prints by artists Patrick Amos, Joe David, Ron Hamilton (Chuuchkamalthnii), Tim Paul, Art Thompson (Tsa-Qwass-Upp), and Glen Webster visually articulates knowledges of histories and stories that are important to the people of the Nuu-chah-nulth nations. These prints are from the university's permanent collection and originate from the print making studio of Vincent Rickard, who worked with these artists in the 1980s and 1990s. Rickard and donors George and Christiane Smyth have given the university nearly 3,000 contemporary Northwest Coast prints, making UVic's collection the most comprehensive in Canada.

Image: Supernatural, Joe David (Nuu-chah-nulth)

Upcoming

EllenNeel

Ellen Neel

The First Woman Totem Pole Carver

January 14, 2017 to April 1, 2017

Curated by Curated by the Williams Legacy Chair Dr. Carolyn Butler Palmer with advising curators David Neel and Lou-ann Neel

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

630 Yates Street

This exhibition celebrates the career of Kwakiutl (Kwakwaka'wakw) carver Ellen Neel (1916-1966), the first woman carver of monumental totem poles. Further, it acknowledge Neel’s influential role as a professional artist and her contribution towards the recognition of Northwest coast Indian art as a contemporary art form. “Our art continues to live, for not only is it part and parcel of us, but can be a powerful factor in combining the best part of Indian culture with the fabric of a truly Canadian art form.” – Ellen Neel

Image credit: Kakasolas (Ellen Neel), carved and painted cedar mask by David Neel (photograph by David Neel)

Grafton Tyler Brown

The Mystery of Grafton Tyler Brown

Race, Art, and Landscape in 19th Century British Columbia

January 21, 2017 to April 1, 2017

Guest curated by Dr. John Lutz (History, UVic) with Emerald Johnstone Bedell and Caroline Riedel.

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown - Small Gallery

630 Yates Street

We know Grafton Tyler Brown (1841-1918) was one of the first professional landscape artists to work in the Pacific Northwest. His few regional paintings that survive offer vivid windows into the world of 1880s Victoria and British Columbia. Yet, how did this African American artist succeed at a time when racial prejudice prevented most Blacks from entering any skilled profession?

Curator's Talk with Guest Lecture
February 4, 2017, 3 - 4:30pm *Light Refreshments Provided

Kick off Black History month with an afternoon presentation about BC’s first black professional artist with UVIC History Department Chair John Lutz and writer and art historian, Robert Chandler.

Performance
March 10, 2017, 7 - 9pm *Light Refreshments Provided

Three local artists, Charles Campbell, Kemi Craig and Ann-Bernice Thomas respond to the story of Grafton Tyler Brown, BC’s first black professional artist.

Image credit: Portrait of Artist Grafton Tyler Brown, Image A-08775 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

WITH CONSERVATION SUPPORT FROM:

RBCM




CREATED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH:

HIST

LearningThroughLookingEYE

Learning Through Looking

Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Art History and Visual Studies at UVic

February 4 to April 13, 2017

Curated by faculty members with graduate students Jaiya Anka and Atri Hatef

Legacy Maltwood (at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

Using diverse historical and contemporary cultural objects, members of the Department of Art History & Visual Studies show how history, learning, and community interweave to support the mission to teach inter-cultural understanding through the study of world arts.

Image credit: Design by Cliff Haman

Events & Programs

Grafton Tyler Brown

The Mystery of Grafton Tyler Brown

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

630 Yates Street

Curator's Talk with Guest Lecture

February 4, 2017, 3 - 4:30pm

Light Refreshments Provided

Kick off Black History month with an afternoon presentation about BC’s first black professional artist with UVIC History Department Chair John Lutz and writer and art historian, Robert Chandler.

Performance

March 10, 2017, 7 - 9pm

Light Refreshments Provided

Three local artists, Charles Campbell, Kemi Craig and Ann-Bernice Thomas respond to the story of Grafton Tyler Brown, BC’s first black professional artist.

Image credit: Portrait of Artist Grafton Tyler Brown, Image A-08775 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

INDEFIANCE

IN DEFIANCE - Programming

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

630 Yates Street

Celebration Event
IN DEFIANCE

Friday October 21, 7-9 pm

Food + Light Refreshments Provided

Free & open to the Public


In Conversation with Lindsay Delaronde & Sarah Hunt

Saturday, October 22, 2-4 pm

Light Refreshments Provided

Join us “In Conversation” with artist Lindsay Katsitsakatste Delaronde (Iroquois/Mohawk) and Sarah Hunt (Kwagiulth), Assistant Professor of Critical Indigenous Geographies to explore this in depth photographic project through various artistic, social and political lenses.

This event was recorded - to watch the video, click here


IN DEFIANCE - Workshops

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

630 Yates Street


WORKSHOPS with Lindsay Delaronde

*To register call Legacy Art Gallery 250.721.6562 / Wed - Sat / 10 - 4pm | Free

Mask Making

Sunday, Nov 6, 2016 1-4 pm

Inspired by the courageous women who expose their inner worlds through self-portraits in the exhibition, In Defiance, artist Lindsay Delaronde, will facilitate a safe and creative environment to explore hidden aspects of ourselves that may have been oppressed by dominant culture and societal norms. Make a mask that shows your external persona and your hidden self. The workshop will begin with a discussion in the exhibition with the artist.


Cornhusk Doll Making

Sunday, Nov 20, 2016 1-4 pm

Facilitated by artist Lindsay Delaronde, as a group we will discuss identity and life experience in light of 33 self-portraits by Indigenous women in the exhibition, In Defiance. Using the discussion as a jumping off point, we will make corn husk dolls as an expression of our essential identities. Learn how the tradition of corn-husk doll making can be used in contemporary contexts to assert personal agency.

WITH GENEROUS SUPPORT FROM:
BCARTSCOUNCIL

Education

STUDENTS

Your collection.
Your art gallery.
Your resource.

The University of Victoria Legacy Art Galleries is a teaching and research centre committed to fostering critical dialogue and meaningful change in our communities.

Visit the galleries on campus and downtown and use the exhibitions and collection to enhance your teaching and research. Gallery staff are available for tours as well as object-based learning opportunities in the classroom.




Booking a Visit to the Legacy Downtown

Please let us know ahead of time to ensure there are no other group bookings. Depending on staff availability, we can offer a short introduction to any exhibition at the Legacy Downtown.

Contact - Gillian Booth, Academic & Community Programs Coordinator
gkbooth@uvic.ca | 250.721.0831

WORKSHOPSelfPortraitTroyNadia Hunter

Open Eyes,
Open Minds

The University of Victoria Legacy Art Galleries is a teaching and research centre committed to fostering critical dialogue and meaningful change in our communities.

A Free Workshop for UVic Classes SPRING TERM | January – March 2017

Join Legacy Art Galleries Educator, Gillian Booth, for a dynamic and educational opportunity to strengthen your cultural competence.

In this two-hour workshop we will:

- Engage with art and visual imagery in an open-ended way

- Learn about ourselves, our biases and our blind spots

- Develop empathy

- Practice being curious in the face of ambiguity.

Participants will be invited to engage individually and communally in a variety of dynamic and thoughtful activities that explore how we can begin a process of decolonizing how we see. We will foster critical thinking and a deep understanding of visual imagery, people and the world around us. This cross-disciplinary resource is offered to any faculty or sessional instructor to book for their classes.

Workshop Details

One two-hour session

Maximum number of participants is 25

On Campus (at Mearns Centre - McPherson Library), Lower Level room 025.

BOOK EARLY – 8 sessions will be offered in Spring term 2017. Registration is dependent on availability of room 025.

Your collection. Your art gallery. Your resource.

Contact - Gillian Booth, Academic & Community Programs Coordinator
gkbooth@uvic.ca | 250.721.0831

Image credit: Self Portrait - Troy and Nadia Hunters, Troy Hunter, 2008.

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Perpetual Salish:

Coast Salish Art in the Classroom

Perpetual Salish: Coast Salish Art in the Classroom is an online resource for teachers, offering cross-curricular lesson plans to engage students and facilitate their understanding of Coast Salish culture and art.

This site is based on the exhibition Perpetual Salish: Contemporary Coast Salish Art from the Salish Weave Collection, curated by Coast Salish artist lessLIE, and originally presented at the University of Victoria's Legacy Art Gallery Downtown (August 15, 2014 - January 10, 2015). The Legacy presented tours of the exhibition for grade four classes to educate the students about Coast Salish art and culture. Coast Salish Art in the Classroom aims to bring this educational initiative to a broader audience.

Click here to visit the website Coast Salish Art in the Classroom

Image wHOle W(((h)))orl(((d))) - lessLIE, Serigraph on paper, 2014

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