Current Exhibitions

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Legacy Downtown

Legacy Downtown

Legacy Downtown is located at 630 Yates Street, Victoria BC Canada.

We Carry Our Ancestors

Cedar, Baskets and Our Relationships with the Land

September 28 - December 21

Legacy Downtown | 630 Yates St.
Lekwungen territory

Curated by Lorilee Wastasecoot (BC Arts Council Curatorial Intern).


Opening Celebration: Saturday, Sept. 28 | 4 to 6 p.m.

We Carry Our Ancestorsweaves together generations of Indigenous women through cedar basketry. For the first time ever, Legacy Art Galleries will exhibit Nuu-chah-nulth and Salish historical baskets from the collection alongside portraits of weavers including Alice Paul, Rosie Ross, Mary Jane Jackson, Mathilda Jim, Julianna Williams, Liz Happynook, Lena Jumbo and Ellen Jumbo by documentary photographer Ulli Steltzer. Contemporary baskets by Salish artists Angela Marston and Brenda Crabtree, among others, will also be exhibited. Through new and intensive community research, this exhibition honours the resilience of women who have carried their cultures forward by passing down the art of cedar basketry to future generations.

Image: Ulli Steltzer, Alice Paul, 1975, Gift of Ulli Steltzer.

Urban Regalia

Contemporary Fashion by Sugiit Lukxs Designs

September 28 - December 21

Reception & Artist Talk: Thursday, Oct. 10 | 7 to 9 p.m.

Inner Gallery
Legacy Downtown | 630 Yates St.
Lekwungen territory

Curated by the Legacy Chair in Modern and Contemporary Arts of the Pacific Northwest and Associate Professor of Art History and Visual Studies Dr. Carolyn Butler Palmer in consultation with Yolonda Skelton.

This exhibition showcases the high fashion designs by contemporary Gitxsan couturier Sugiit Lukxs (Yolonda Skelton). Her textile art is inspired and created from traditional oral stories told to her by her late maternal grandmother Na-gwa (Lily Jackson) and the 1960s fashion of movie star Audrey Hepburn. Sugiit Lukxs’ one-of-a-kind modern robes of power combine the aesthetic beauty of her culture with her love of fashion. Her work aims to strengthen private cultural property rights and to share teachings that benefit Indigenous knowledge and oral traditions, so that they have a more prominent place in our society.

Image: Photo by Peter Jensen, Sugiit Lukxs Designs, Vancouver Indigenous Fashion Week 2017.

Legacy Maltwood

Legacy Malwood is located on campus at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library

Object Biographies

Artists' Lives through their Archives

September 19 to January 12, 2020

Opening Launch: September 26 | 4:30 to 6:30 p.m.

Legacy Maltwood | at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library
Lekwungen territory

Curated by Bradley Clements with Caroline Riedel

A printing block. Glaze samples. Pouches of pigments. Why are these items in UVic’s archives, and what can they tell us about the lives, relationships, artworks and practices of the artists who owned them? Bringing together materials from UVic’s Special Collections and University Archives in partnership with the Legacy Art Galleries, Object Biographies is a glimpse into the lives of artists through their archives.

Image: Robin Hopper, cobalt glaze tests (detail), Courtesy of University of Victoria Libraries Special Collections and University Archives

First Peoples House

Located on campus, First Peoples House displays artwork from the University Collection through rotating exhibitions.

Our Relations

September 2018 - December 2019

Curated by Wyatt Schiefelbein, Young Canada Works Graduate Intern

First Peoples House, UVic Campus
Lekwungen territory

For hours & location click here

This exhibition focuses on the notion of relationship mîyo-wîcehtowin or good/beautiful relationship. Some pieces tell stories of relationships that have been formed and maintained since the Beginning and which continue to develop to this day. Other pieces show the formation of new relationships based on respect and kinship, while still others reflect the interconnectedness of all things.

By better understanding the ways in which relationships function in our everyday lives, we can learn how to create and maintain mîyo-wîcehtowin on Turtle Island.

Image: The Dance of Life and Death, Abraham Apakark Anghik Ruben, n.d.

We acknowledge the support Young Canada Works at Building Careers in Heritage

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