Tag Archives: Prints

Out of the Frame: Salish Printmaking

poster-workingJune 8 to October 1, 2016

In collaboration with Wachiay Studio (Andy McDougall) and curated by Dr. Andrea N. Walsh.

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown | 630 Yates Street

Featuring work by Charles Elliott, Doug LaFortune, Angela Marston, Andy Everson, Maynard Johnny Jr., lessLIE, Chris Paul, and Dylan Thomas.

Coast Salish artists challenge ideas about printmaking by bringing the process of printing into relation with cultural traditions, personal experiences and the material world.

View the exhibition website here

invitation banner 2

Celebration Event + Artist Roundtable

Out of the Frame: Salish Printmaking

Food + Refreshments Provided
Free + open to the public | *Please note seating is limited.

September 24, 1 – 4pm | Legacy Art Gallery Downtown | 630 Yates Street

An afternoon event featuring an artist roundtable discussion with the artists from Out of the Frame: Salish Printmaking on the role of printmaking in their practices and new directions for printing taken up in the exhibition. Discussion will be moderated by curator, Dr. Andrea Walsh. Featuring a guest talk reflecting on the production of prints by Salish artists given by independent scholar India Rael Young.

1-2pm – Welcome + talk by India Rael Young “The Visual Vernacular in a World of Prints”
2-2:15pm – Break – light refreshments
2:15-3:15pm – Artist roundtable
3:15–4pm – Celebration with the Tzinquaw Dancers

Out of the Frame artists are: Charles Elliott, Doug LaFortune, Angela Marston, Andy Everson, Maynard Johnny Jr., lessLIE, Chris Paul, and Dylan Thomas

India Rael Young is an Andrew W. Mellon Dissertation Fellow in Art History at the University of New Mexico. Young’s research addresses the history of contemporary Native and First Nations prints from the Northwest Coast. More broadly, Young’s interests lie in North American print media, and emerging modes of reproduction. Her curatorship and writing negotiate feminist, post-colonial, and critical race frameworks to expose the complex web of cultural underpinnings in the North American art world.

unlimited edition

poster final with canada logoJuly 4 – September 26, 2015

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown 630 Yates Street

unlimited edition is organized by the Kamloops Art Gallery.

Curated by Tania Willard (Secwepemc), Aboriginal Curator in Residence, Kamloops Art Gallery

To view the exhibition catalogue, click here.

Kenojuak Ashevak, Inuit | Carl Beam, Ojibwe | Robert Davidson, Haida | Charles Greul | Chuuchkamalathnii, Nuu-chah-nulth | Mark Henderson, Kwakwaka’wakw | Richard Hunt, Kwakwaka’wakw | Ellen Neel, Kwakwaka’wakw | Pudlo Pudlat, Inuit | Daphne Odjig, Odawa-Potawatomi | Walter J Phillips | Bill Reid, Haida | Chief Henry Speck, Kwakwaka’wakw | Art Thompson, Nuu-chah-nulth | Art Wilson, Gitsxan
With artists from the University of Victoria Art Collection: Doug Cranmer, Kwakwaka’wakw | Joe David, Nuu-chah-nulth | Stan Greene, Coast Salish | Roy Henry Vickers, Tsimshian Haida heilstuk | Susan Point, Coast Salish
unlimited edition attempts to construct an art historical framework that looks at how prints by Aboriginal and Inuit artists represented in the Kamloops Art Gallery’s permanent collection, supplemented by works on loan from the Carleton University Art Gallery and Legacy Art Galleries, represent a drive to preserve, portray and popularize oral histories and address social inequities in the medium of printmaking. Featuring prints from Northwest Coast, Woodlands and Inuit artists with a focus on an early period of printmaking in the 50s through to the 70s, unlimited edition showcases prints that relate to ideas of cultural story, politics of land, and the beauty of Indigenous aesthetics.

Image Spirit Owl, Kenojuak Ashevak (Inuit), from Kenojuak Lithography series, 1979

CURATOR’S TALK /// Saturday, September 26, 2pm | Legacy Art Gallery Downtown 630 Yates Street /// Free & open to the public

This project is funded in part by the Government of Canada.

gov of canada logo

poster final with canada logo
Rack Card with gov logoRack Card side 2

Epiphany: Highlights from the Legacy Permanent Collection

Image: Maxwell Bates Circus People, 1969

Image: Maxwell Bates Circus People, 1969

May 1 – July 15 2014

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Mary Jo Hughes

An epiphany in its broadest sense is the experience of sudden realization or insight. Through an epiphany, our world broadens and new understandings and ideas are unlocked. Indeed, this widening of perspective remains the ultimate goal for most artists. The experience of epiphany is what the exhibition aims to engender in viewers through highlights from the extensive permanent collection held by the University of Victoria’s Legacy Art Galleries. It is intended that each piece will offer a unique insight or a fresh experience that was not entirely expected. Artists in the exhibition include, Robert Davidson, Emily Carr, Norval Morrisseau, Lawren Harris, Frederick Varley, Jean-Paul Riopelle, Myfannwy Pavelic, Robert Rauschenberg, and Jack Shadbolt, among others.

Honoris Causa: University of Victoria First Nations Artist Honourands

Henry Hunt, Kwagiulth Chief and Frog

Henry Hunt, Kwagiulth Chief and Frog

February 2014

First Peoples House at the University of Victoria

Curated by Emerald Johnstone-Bedell

Twice yearly at convocation the University of Victoria awards honorary degrees to those who have demonstrated distinguished and extraordinary achievements. During its 50-year history UVic has granted honours to seven First Nations artists who have contributed not only to the arts but also to the community at large as leaders, activists, visionaries, role models, and groundbreakers. This exhibition features works from the University of Victoria’s art collection and an excerpt from the citation that was read at the occasion of granting the degree.

Coalescence: Bridging Contemporeneity & Tradition

Richard Hunt, An Eagle [and golf course]

Richard Hunt, An Eagle [and golf course]

August 28 – November 18, 2013

Legacy Maltwood (at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

Curated by Emerald Johnstone-Bedell and Lesley Golding

This exhibition at the Maltwood Prints and Drawings Gallery offers an in-depth look at the work of five contemporary Northwest Coast artists: Francis Dick, Charles Elliott, Richard Hunt, Tim Paul and Moy Sutherland. Drawing on works from the University of Victoria’s extensive Northwest Coast print collection, this exhibition demonstrates how the artists use traditional stylistic elements and cultural references to express contemporary experience.

These five artists represent the three main culture groups of Vancouver Island: Coast Salish, Nuu-chah-nulth and Kwakwaka’wakw and were selected for their innovative work as well as their longstanding influential relationships with both the university and the local community.

Highlights of the exhibition include Richard Hunt’s An Eagle [and golf course], which injects both humour and unexpected imagery into a traditional formline composition, and Francis Dick’s Comes a Woman, which addresses female spirituality. Additional themes include environmentalism, the Christian faith, cultural revival, commercialization, mentorship and personal relationships. The prints are accompanied by quotes from the artist providing insight into the inspiration and creative process associated with the work.

Core Samples: Visual Arts Faculty 1966-1986

Don Harvey, Black Diamond #3

Don Harvey, Black Diamond #3

June 19 – October 25, 2013

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Caroline Riedel

View the online catalogue:

Core Samples – Catalogue

This exhibition presents an overview of the University of Victoria’s Visual Arts department from its earliest days as a breakaway department from the Faculty of Education to the individually and collectively earned reputations for innovation in painting, printmaking, drawing, photography and sculpture.

Thirteen artists who were also appointed faculty members are included in this exhibition including John Dobereiner, Donald Harvey, Pat Martin Bates, Gwen Curry, Douglas Morton, Roland Brener, Mowry Baden and Fred Douglas. Primarily drawing on work from the university’s permanent collection, this exhibition reflects a range of media and groundbreaking artistic practice.

Similar Exhibitions:

Understanding Place in Culture: Serigraphs and Transmission of Cultural Knowledge

Francis Dick, The Dragon
Francis Dick, The Dragon

October 18, 2012 – January 28, 2013

Legacy Maltwood (at Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

Curated by Shelby Richardson

The Understanding Place in Culture online catalogue is available here. It features a curatorial essay, numerous works of art and information about the artists.

Museums and other educational institutions are often seen as sites of privileged knowledge production, spaces that have often excluded minority perspectives and realities. This exhibition presents a selection of prints from the George and Christiane Smyth and Vincent Rickard Northwest Coast Print collection that focus on representations of place and Indigenous knowledge production. The perspectives represented by these artists challenge the hegemonic practices of institutions, such as museums, by positioning the artists as the ethnographic authorities on their cultural expressions and knowledge.

The Art of Jack Wise

Jack Wise, Mandala

Mandala, Jack Wise

 

June 8 – August 12, 2012

Legacy Maltwood (at Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

Curated by Nicholas Tuele

Jack Wise’s work is deeply personal and spiritually profound. Known for his calligraphy, Chinese brushwork, and mandalas, which embody Buddhist cosmology or worldview, Jack Wise was a prolific artist and popular mentor and teacher. This exhibition features a selection of stunning and memorable paintings, prints, drawings and calligraphy by Wise, who spent a considerable part of his artistic career on the west coast. Most of the selected works are part of the permanent collections of the University of Victoria Art Collections and University Archives, given to the University in 2008.

Convergence/Divergence: Landscape and Identity on the West Coast

Head of Canada, Katherine Emma Maltwood, sandstone, 1912

Head of Canada, Katherine Emma Maltwood, sandstone, 1912

August 17 – October 1, 2011

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Caroline Riedel

View the online catalogue:

Convergence/Divergence Catalogue

Click here to read more about this show on the University of Victoria’s website.

This exhibition explores how a selection of artists from diverse cultural backgrounds respond to the West Coast landscape as a means of expressing identity, while also suggesting ways in which an artist’s identity provides a lens for presenting or interpreting landscape.

The works highlight contrasting artistic approaches and ways of relating to local landscapes, illustrating both First Nations and settler’s complex relationships to the places they live. Through a selection of prints, drawings, sculpture, paintings and mixed media works, this exhibit shows some of the many ways in which West Coast artists express identity in terms of a sense of self, place, or community.

The title of this exhibition refers at once to both commonalities in how people relate to, identify with, inhabit or “resonate” with a particular place (convergence) and the different ways artists see, experience, represent and interpret that place (divergence).

Salish Reflections

Susan Point, Symphony of Butterlies
Susan Point, Symphony of Butterlies

September 2011 – Present

Cornett Building, University of Victoria Campus

The online catalogue for Salish Reflections is available here. It features a self-guided art tour, numerous artworks and artist biographies.

As part of the renovations completed in the Fall of 2011, and with the generosity of George and Christiane Smyth, the Cornett Building has become an established centre for Coast Salish art. By displaying 26 artworks created by six Coast Salish artists, the University of Victoria and the Faculty of Social Sciences hopes to honour the history, customs, and culture of the Coast Salish, while inspiring student, faculty, and the greater community.

This installation has been named Salish Reflections for two reasons. Firstly, lessLIE’s piece Reflections has been used to decorate all exterior doors of Cornett, so it seemed fit to incorporate this important work even further. Secondly, the aim of the installation is to become more familiar with and reflect upon the Coast Salish art of our region. This website was created to be a destination for those wishing to learn more about Coast Salish peoples and their art.