Tag Archives: Painting

The Art of Jack Wise

Jack Wise, Mandala

Mandala, Jack Wise

 

June 8 – August 12, 2012

Legacy Maltwood (at Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

Curated by Nicholas Tuele

Jack Wise’s work is deeply personal and spiritually profound. Known for his calligraphy, Chinese brushwork, and mandalas, which embody Buddhist cosmology or worldview, Jack Wise was a prolific artist and popular mentor and teacher. This exhibition features a selection of stunning and memorable paintings, prints, drawings and calligraphy by Wise, who spent a considerable part of his artistic career on the west coast. Most of the selected works are part of the permanent collections of the University of Victoria Art Collections and University Archives, given to the University in 2008.

In the Moment

In the Moment, Frances Baskerville

In the Moment, Frances Baskerville

May 16 – June 9, 2012

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Elyse Portal

Featuring Fran Baskerville’s creative process after answering a proposal to create public art at the Gordon Head Rec Centre. In the Moment reveals Baskerville’s creative process in response to a public art call to celebrate multiculturalism and community in the Greater Victoria Region. To answer the call, Frances embarked on an artistic journey of site-visits, photographic reconnaissance, and research spanning aikido, Degas, Cézanne and the Olympics.

“Whether it takes the form of physical movement, as in dance, or the form of emotional or spiritual intensity, I try to capture particular moments,” Frances Baskerville.

Her practice navigates themes of imprisonment and liberation through painting the human form, “My figures are striving …often for something they cannot reach or can reach only momentarily. Moments of release are short-lived but beautiful.”

Click to watch the video

Divergence: Insights into Studio Practices

Bill Zuk, Opal Ice
Bill Zuk, Opal Ice

February 29 – April 14, 2012

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

From the studios of 19 University of Victoria art education instructors in the Faculty of Education comes a rich and diverse exhibition of images and objects that range through traditional and newer media. Working independently in their studios, these artist/educators collaborate and exchange ideas on a daily basis while working with students, engaging them in creative problem solving, and assisting in the preparation of work for exhibitions.

What they hold in common is a commitment to both the classroom and the studio as sites of research and dissemination. Teaching informs studio practice and studio informs teaching practice in the daily ebb and flow of professional life. This exhibition invites visitors to experience that dynamic interaction.

Mark Laver: Shining Examples

I Want to be a Shining Example, Mark Laver

I Want to be a Shining Example, Mark Laver

March 1 – March 31, 2012

Legacy Small Gallery

Dark, wet, Vancouver Island nights receive a painterly treatment in Mark Laver’s intimate Night Paintings and ambitious Rural Disasters.

Be it urban parks after midnight, trailer park fires, nocturnal car crashes or rural highways, the exhibit reveals a battle between the psychological and narrative power of nocturnal imagery and the allure of oil paint itself. Smeared, swirled, glazed and dripped, the luscious materiality of paint is as much the subject of these paintings as the landscape Laver calls home.

Similar Exhibitions

Images of Internment: Paintings by Dr. Henry Shimizu

Henry Shimizu, Painting #3
Henry Shimizu, Painting #3

November 19, 2011 – February 2, 2012

Legacy Maltwood (at Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

In 1999, Dr. Henry Shimizu created a series of oil paintings based on his life as a teenager in the New Denver Japanese Internment Camp, BC, from 1942 to 1946. Images of Internment is an attempt to highlight the activities and lifestyle of the internees in this camp; they are the memories of a teenager and his friends.

According to Shimizu, despite isolation from mainstream Canadian Society during this time, the development of young Japanese Canadians progressed in almost the same pattern as any other Canadian teenager. One would have thought that this internment experience would have embittered this group and led to widespread despair and depression. Instead, says Shimizu, they came away from the experience more determined to be successful Canadians, contrary to the intention of those who promoted and carried out this injustice of internment and exile.

In Her Own Words

Chill Day in June, Emily Carr, oil on paper, 1938-1939

Chill Day in June, Emily Carr, oil on paper, 1938-1939

October 5 – November 19, 2011

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Caroline Riedel

View the online catalogue:

In Her Own Words Catalogue

This exhibition explores the artistic visions and words, both spoken and written, of three of Victoria’s best-known artists of the 20th century: Emily Carr, Katharine Maltwood, and Myfanwy Pavelic. While their artistic expression led them along different trajectories each as a painter, sculptor and portraitist, they also crossed paths in a number of instances as supporters of one another’s artistic pursuits, in their shared search for iconic imagery from the point of view of artists on the West Coast of Canada and in their exploration of both modern and traditional means of expression.

Convergence/Divergence: Landscape and Identity on the West Coast

Head of Canada, Katherine Emma Maltwood, sandstone, 1912

Head of Canada, Katherine Emma Maltwood, sandstone, 1912

August 17 – October 1, 2011

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Caroline Riedel

View the online catalogue:

Convergence/Divergence Catalogue

Click here to read more about this show on the University of Victoria’s website.

This exhibition explores how a selection of artists from diverse cultural backgrounds respond to the West Coast landscape as a means of expressing identity, while also suggesting ways in which an artist’s identity provides a lens for presenting or interpreting landscape.

The works highlight contrasting artistic approaches and ways of relating to local landscapes, illustrating both First Nations and settler’s complex relationships to the places they live. Through a selection of prints, drawings, sculpture, paintings and mixed media works, this exhibit shows some of the many ways in which West Coast artists express identity in terms of a sense of self, place, or community.

The title of this exhibition refers at once to both commonalities in how people relate to, identify with, inhabit or “resonate” with a particular place (convergence) and the different ways artists see, experience, represent and interpret that place (divergence).

Regarding Wealth

U001.11.562

The Apple Tree Gang, Michael Lewis, 1992, acrylic on canvas

February 24  – June 10, 2010

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Dr. Carolyn Butler-Palmer

This was an exhibition concerning the intersections between art and homelessness. This exhibition was part of an ongoing series of projects and class seminars featuring artwork from the University of Victoria’s Michael Williams Collection led by Dr. Carolyn Butler-Palmer who occupies the Williams Legacy Chair.

Visit the HA 495/595 Regarding Wealth  website

Contributors: Dr. Carolyn Butler-Palmer, Williams Legacy Chair in Modern and Contemporary Arts of the Pacific Northwest

History in Art Students who enriched this project: Eric Anderson, Magdalyn Asimaskis, Julia R.M. Baker Veronica Best, Jennifer Cador, Won Chang, Sara Chekley, Gareth Clayton, Miranda Clement, Jaime Lynn Clifton, Emma Conner, Odessa Corletto, Heather Crowley, Melba Dalsin, Heather Dixon, Kim Drabyk, Susan Hawkins, Laura Hayward, Julia Hulbert, Elaina Keppler, Emma Knight, Stephanie Korn, Toby Lawrence, Sarah Lee, Katie Lemmon, Elyse Longair, Marnie Mandell, Mathew McKay, Kaitlyn Patience, Kathleen Prince, Andrea Porritt, Cassidy Richardson, Jysicca Richardson, Connie Quaedvlieg, Mike Quan, Aleta Salmon, Nancy Schnarr, Katy Scoones, Julia Simpson, Thomas Sluchinski, Leah Taylor, Filiz Tutuncu, Holly Unsworth, Christine Woychesko and India Young.

Research Assistants: Mebla Dalsin, Kaitlyn Patience, and Tusa Shea

Special Thanks to: Sarah J. Blackstone, Dean of Fine Arts, Catherine Harding, Department Chair, History in Art, Kate Hutchins, Legacy Art Gallery & Café, Martin Segger, Maltwood Gallery Director, Caroline Riedel, Maltwood Curator of Collections, Christine Woychesko, Manager, Legacy Gallery & Café, and Caitlin Cuthbert , Jenina Ceglarz, CEO Swans Hotel, Cindy Vance Maltwood Exhibition Team: Emma Conner, Caitlin Cuthbert, Kate Dahlgren, Mark Hovey, Karen Merrifield, Cam Northover, Nick Poppell, Heather Stone, Leah Taylor

British Sporting Art: Works From the S.W. Jackman Collection

The Death, S.W. Forest, c. 1800, tinted engraving

The Death, S.W. Forest, c. 1800, tinted engraving

April 14 – June 6, 2010

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Martin Segger and Karen Merrifield

View the online catalogue:

British Sporting Catalogue

Sporting Art’s development was centred in England and for this reason is accepted as being “British.” The increased popularity of racing, fox hunting and shooting created a new niche for artists to fill. Naturalism is a theme found throughout this exhibition. These paintings are representations of social life, reverence for the landscape and portraiture.

The artists in this collection would have been aware of the great sporting artists of the 17th-19th centuries, and we can see their inspiration and influence from the grand portrayals of the mighty stallion standing proud and strong amidst the luminous landscape to the commotion and excitement of the fox hunt bringing forth to the public the beloved pastimes of 19th century England.

Dr. Sydney W. Jackman has been a History professor since 1964 and received an honorary degree by the University of Victoria in 1991. He has also been a life-long art collector. The University has benefitted from his generous donations, an extensive collection of blue and white Chinese porcelain and a large collection of English 18th and 19th century art. It is from the latter that this exhibition of “British sporting art” has been selected.

Revival: The Personal Archive of Robert Aller

Robert Aller

Robert Aller, Mask

February 23 – April 11, 2010

Legacy Small Gallery

Curatorial team: Leah Taylor with Emma Conner, Karen Merrifield and Cindy Vance

Revival is a snapshot into the vast personal archives of the late artist and teacher Robert Aller. Revival is one concern that has been addressed throughout Aller’s artistic practice – he examines the loss of First Nation’s culture and becomes influenced by their history in craft and tradition, which surfaces in his drawings, paintings and basketry.

While studying under Arthur Lismur at the School of Art and Design in Montreal, Aller’s interest in native art grew, and in later years it became his lifelong challenge to document the lives of First Nations people.