Tag Archives: Painting

The Averted Eye Sees: The Life and Work of Glenn Howarth – Part II

 

October 15, 2016 to January 7, 2017

Curated by Jenelle Pasiechnik (UVic MA, 2015)
With supervision from Caroline Riedel (Legacy Art Galleries)

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown | 630 Yates Street

Exhibition Website

Glenn Howarth was a pillar in Victoria’s arts scene from the late 1970s until his death in 2009. He also had an enduring connection to the University of Victoria — as a Visual Arts student in the 1960s, a sessional instructor, an artist-in-residence with the Engineering Department, and recently with a bequest of his archival papers and digital art. Howarth was an innovative creator and inspired teacher searching for ways to communicate the artistic process and the perceptual functions of the eye and brain that contribute to visual perception. His work was often infused with surrealistic imagery which recalls the work of Francis Bacon. Howarth was also responsible for innovations in computer graphic art in the early 1980s working on the Telidon system as an artist in residence at UVic’s Engineering Department with Dr. Ernest Chang. He represented Canada with this work in the Sao Paulo Biennale and at Expo 86.

The Averted Eye Sees draws on UVic’s significant collection of Howarth paintings primarily from the Michael C. Williams estate, as well as Howarth’s writing, sketches, ephemera, and digital archive, part of the regional artists archive initiative of UVic Libraries Special Collections and Archives. It also includes a fascinating case study on the challenges of ‘retro-computing’ in recreating Howarth’s early experiments in digital artwork.

Due to the popularity of the exhibition on campus this summer, a second edition of this exhibition will be featured in the small gallery downtown, allowing for the viewing of a larger selection of Howarth’s powerful oeuvre.

The Averted Eye Sees: The Life and Work of Glenn Howarth

 

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July 30, 2016 to October 23, 2016

Curated by Jenelle Pasiechnik (UVic MA, 2015)
With supervision from Caroline Riedel (Legacy Art Galleries)

Legacy Maltwood (at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

Exhibition Website

Glenn Howarth was a pillar in Victoria’s arts scene from the late 1970s until his death in 2009. He was an innovative creator and inspired teacher searching for ways to communicate the artistic process and the perceptual functions of the eye and brain that contribute to visual perception. He was also responsible for innovations in computer graphic art in the early 1980s working on the Telidon system as an artist in residence in the Engineering Department at the University of Victoria campus with Dr. Ernest Chang. In 1983 he represented Canada in the Sao Paulo Biennale with some of this work and also presented it locally at  the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria and UVic’s Maltwood Art Museum and Gallery.

The Averted Eye Sees draws on UVic’s significant collection of Howarth paintings from the Michael C. Williams estate, as well as Howarth’s writing, sketches, ephemera, and digital archive, part of the regional artists archive initiative of UVic Libraries Special Collections and Archives. It also includes a fascinating case study on the challenges of ‘retro-computing’ in recreating Howarth’s early experiments in  digital artwork.

 

Curator’s Tour + Reception

The Averted Eye Sees: The Life and Work of Glenn Howarth

October 7, 3:30-5pm

Free & open to the Public

Room 027 – Legacy Maltwood (at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

Join us for a curator’s tour and special showing of archival materials to celebrate local artist and educator Glenn Howarth and his lifelong obsession with visual perception. The exhibition includes paintings, drawings, prints and Howarth’s pioneering work in digital art (recently restored by the UVic Libraries), for which he received international recognition at the 1983 Sao Paulo Biennale and at Expo 86. Highlights of Howarth’s extensive personal archive including journals, letters, sketches and photographs will be seen at this one-time event. Reception to follow.

Guest curator Jenelle M. Pasechnik was the recipient of the 2015 Margaret Russell Graduate Internship in Curatorial Studies, which supports the preservation of art created by BC artists.

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Making A Scene! Victoria’s Artists in the 1960s

Gods of the Sun Dogs, Margaret Ellen, c. 1960

Gods of the Sun Dogs, Margaret Ellen, c. 1960

April 2 – June 27, 2015

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Emerald Johnstone-Bedell

The 1960s marked the emergence of a vibrant contemporary art scene in Victoria. Events such as the BC centennial celebrations and Expo ’67 foregrounded regional and national artistic production, and the newly formed Canada Council for the Arts around a source of financial support to practicing artists. The politically charged spirit of the time, born out of war experiences and social justice movements, generated a desire for change and experimentation. This included artistic movements towards anti-hierarchial approaches inclusive of applied and non-Western art.

This show brought together ceramics, film, printmaking, painting, and sculpture to give visitors a glimpse of what the art scene of the 1960s would have looked like. Making a Scene! also highlighted the importance of growing institutions and movements of the 60s like the budding University of Victoria Art Collection, the birth of the Limners group, and the establishment of rights for First Nations artists.

View the exhibition website here

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Similar Exhibitions:

Margaret Peterson: A Search In Rhythm

Portrait of Margaret Peterson by Curtis Lantinga, 1984SMALLApril 11 – August 18, 2014

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Discover more about Margaret Peterson by visiting the project website, click here.

Watch a short video about Margaret Peterson featuring Patricia Bovey | Robert Amos | Nick Tuele | Anne Mayhew | by Justine Drummond, click here.

This special curatorial project was developed in partnership with the University of Victoria Legacy Art Galleries and UVic’s Special Collections and University Archives with funding support from the BC Arts Council. The project allowed for a co-op intern to select and develop a project to present new interpretations and scholarship utilizing primary research material and original works of art held at the university. Under the mentorship of the Legacy Art Gallery Director, Curator of Collections, and the University Archivist, the student created an exhibition and public program that highlights a major Canadian artist and furthers an important initiative of the University of Victoria, namely the building of the local artists’ archival holdings. This exhibition is one of the first of a series working with the artists’ archives at the University of Victoria.

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Windows Into Heaven: Religious Icons from the Permanent Collection

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Icon of the Virgin Hodegetria, 18th century, Gift of Dr. Bruce and Mrs. Dorothy Brown

April 23 – July 19, 2014

Legacy Small Gallery

View the online catalogue:

Windows Into Heaven Catalogue

Co-curated by graduate student Regan Shrumm and Dr. Evanthia Baboula, (History in Art)

Featuring Russian icons and crucifixes from the University of Victoria’s permanent collection, this exhibition examines religious, historical, and cultural meanings past and present.

The objects featured in this exhibition originate in pre-revolutionary Russia and include icons of varied forms as well as crosses – important liturgical instruments and quintessential Christian symbols.

Epiphany: Highlights from the Legacy Permanent Collection

Image: Maxwell Bates Circus People, 1969

Image: Maxwell Bates Circus People, 1969

May 1 – July 15 2014

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Mary Jo Hughes

An epiphany in its broadest sense is the experience of sudden realization or insight. Through an epiphany, our world broadens and new understandings and ideas are unlocked. Indeed, this widening of perspective remains the ultimate goal for most artists. The experience of epiphany is what the exhibition aims to engender in viewers through highlights from the extensive permanent collection held by the University of Victoria’s Legacy Art Galleries. It is intended that each piece will offer a unique insight or a fresh experience that was not entirely expected. Artists in the exhibition include, Robert Davidson, Emily Carr, Norval Morrisseau, Lawren Harris, Frederick Varley, Jean-Paul Riopelle, Myfannwy Pavelic, Robert Rauschenberg, and Jack Shadbolt, among others.

Paradox

Daniel Laskarin, blue chair :: if this

Daniel Laskarin, blue chair :: if this

October 31, 2013 –  January 11, 2014

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Mary Jo Hughes

par-a-dox n. 1. A statement that seems to contradict itself but may nonetheless be true.

The notion of paradox provides an apt means of curating seven divergent artists who make up the University of Victoria’s Visual Arts department. Despite their widely varying practices, they share fundamental interests in the contradictory nature of our very physical and psychic experiences in, and of, the world around us.

Paradox presents the recent work of the artists teaching in department of Visual Arts of the University of Victoria. The seven faculty members (Daniel Laskarin, Sandra Meigs, Robert Youds, Vikky Alexander, Lynda Gammon, Jennifer Stillwell, and Paul Walde) are mid-career and senior artists with national and international careers. Each artist will be represented by work characteristic of current practice relating to the theme of the paradox implicit in our experience of art.

Paradox aims to bring wider understanding to the particular strengths of this nationally acclaimed academic program, which is rooted in explorations of phenomenology and in the perceptual, conceptual, and interactive contexts of contemporary visual art.

Events:

An opening reception was held on November 1, 2013 with the seven artists and public in attendance.

On December 1, 2013 an experimental concert titled Music for Mycologists was held in support of Paradox. Paul Walde’s large mushroom spore prints (Interdeterminacy, 2012) also act as musical notation. Tina Pearson (flute, voice), George Tzanetakis (bass clarinet) and Paul Walde (bass guitar) interpreted the prints sonically and also played pieces by John Cage and Vaclav Halek.

American composer John Cage was an avid mycologist. Cage often quipped that music and mushrooms have nothing to do with one another except for the fact that they appear next to each other in the dictionary. Experimental Music Unit put this statement to the test.

Similar Exhibitions:

Core Samples: Visual Arts Faculty 1966-1986

Don Harvey, Black Diamond #3

Don Harvey, Black Diamond #3

June 19 – October 25, 2013

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Caroline Riedel

View the online catalogue:

Core Samples – Catalogue

This exhibition presents an overview of the University of Victoria’s Visual Arts department from its earliest days as a breakaway department from the Faculty of Education to the individually and collectively earned reputations for innovation in painting, printmaking, drawing, photography and sculpture.

Thirteen artists who were also appointed faculty members are included in this exhibition including John Dobereiner, Donald Harvey, Pat Martin Bates, Gwen Curry, Douglas Morton, Roland Brener, Mowry Baden and Fred Douglas. Primarily drawing on work from the university’s permanent collection, this exhibition reflects a range of media and groundbreaking artistic practice.

Similar Exhibitions:

Creating Con[text]

Jack Shadbolt, Biomorphic
Jack Shadbolt, Biomorphic

March 13 – June 15, 2013

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Dr. Carolyn Butler Palmer, Williams Legacy Chair in Modern and Contemporary Arts of the Pacific Northwest

Creating Con[text] activates works of art in the University of Victoria’s Michael Williams Bequest Collection through the oral history research of Dr. Carolyn Butler Palmer and her graduate students. Over the course of a number of years Dr. Butler Palmer and her students have gathered an extensive array of interviews with people associated with the late downtown businessman and art supporter Michael Collard Williams and the artists he collected.  Featuring paintings by Angela Grossman, Jack Shadbolt and Emily Carr, eminent British Columbia painters whose careers span more than a century into present day, the exhibition allows the stories of artists, dealers, collectors, and viewers to infuse the works of art with more deeply understood meaning.

Similar Exhibition:

To Reunite To Honour To Witness

Phyllis Tate, Untitled (1959)

Phyllis Tate, Untitled (1959)

May 8 – June 15, 2013

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Dr. Robina Thomas and Dr. Andrea N. Walsh

The vibrant and powerful paintings in this exhibition were created by children who attended the Alberni Indian Residential School in the late 1950s and early 1960s. The works were created in an extra-curricular art class run by artist Robert Aller.

Over 50 years later, residential school survivors who attended the school and created these paintings are working together with UVic faculty and staff to document the role of art in residential schools through individual stories and works of art.

The paintings in this exhibition provide an exceptional and rare opportunity to witness the power of children’s creativity during residential schooling, when their voices were actively silenced by assimilationist government policies. The exhibition asks viewers to consider the role of this art today at a time when Canada is attempting reconciliation around this history with Indigenous peoples.

Honoris Causa: Artist Honorary Degree Recipients

Jack Shadbolt, Hockey Owl
Jack Shadbolt, Hockey Owl

November 28, 2012 – March 9, 2013

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Mary Jo Hughes

Honorary degrees are granted by the University of Victoria to individuals who have demonstrated distinguished and extraordinary achievements. Over its 50-year history UVic has bestowed honours to many artists who have contributed not only to the field of visual arts but also to the community at large.

Honoris Causa is an exhibition featuring works by many of these artists who are represented in the University of Victoria Art Collections including E. J. Hughes, Carole Sabiston, Robert Davidson, Jack Shadbolt, Bill Reid, Ted Harrison, Pat Martin Bates and Susan Point, among many others. Celebrating UVic’s 50th Anniversary this exhibition recognized not only the work but the broad social impact that these creative individuals have had.

Click here to view the UVic 50th Anniversary page.

Transformation: A Retrospective

Duncan Regehr, Untitled I
Untitled I, Duncan Regehr, 2010

June 13 – August 24, 2012

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Nicholas Tuele

View the online catalogue:

Transformation: A Retrospective Catalogue

For the summer months the Legacy Art Gallery Downtown presents a full retrospective of Duncan Regehr’s “Transformation” body of work. Through a wide-ranging presentation of media the viewer will become acquainted with the artist’s working method: to develop a series of paintings, sculptures, drawings and writings that project and explore a common theme or philosophy. By delving into the collective subconscious and the psyche, Regehr produces images of an intense personal nature, which invites reciprocal identification by the viewer.

Poetry Reading and Curator’s Talk, Saturday July 14 at 1:30pm – 3:30pm.