Tag Archives: British Columbia

Karl Spreitz

Karl Spreitz scouting locations for the BC FIlm Commission in Stewart, B.C.

Karl Spreitz scouting locations for the BC FIlm Commission in Stewart, B.C.

Online Catalogues

There are two online catalogues of Karl Spreitz’s work. Karl Spreitz and Collaborators Archival Film Collection (2013) features many of his films, essays, transcripts and biographies of Spreitz and his collaborators.  Karl Spreitz Film Collection (2001) has an inventory of his works, a glossary of film terms and information about Spreitz’s work.

More About the Exhibitions

The Karl Spreitz Film Collection at the University of Victoria consists of more than 100 reels of 16mm film in various stages of production. Many of these films were produced by Spreitz in collaboration with other artists and friends such as Colin Browne, Vicky Husband, Anne Mayhew, Michael Morris and Herbert Siebner and are both personal and documentary in nature.

Covering a period of more than three decades, the content of the films describe the working process of local artists, historic events, and political and environmental issues. The collection is of tremendous historic value both in terms of film production in British Columbia, subject matter, and as a partial record of Spreitz’s career.

 

Understanding Place in Culture: Serigraphs and Transmission of Cultural Knowledge

Francis Dick, The Dragon
Francis Dick, The Dragon

October 18, 2012 – January 28, 2013

Legacy Maltwood (at Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

Curated by Shelby Richardson

The Understanding Place in Culture online catalogue is available here. It features a curatorial essay, numerous works of art and information about the artists.

Museums and other educational institutions are often seen as sites of privileged knowledge production, spaces that have often excluded minority perspectives and realities. This exhibition presents a selection of prints from the George and Christiane Smyth and Vincent Rickard Northwest Coast Print collection that focus on representations of place and Indigenous knowledge production. The perspectives represented by these artists challenge the hegemonic practices of institutions, such as museums, by positioning the artists as the ethnographic authorities on their cultural expressions and knowledge.

The University of Victoria: A Community of Communities

University of Victoria Alma Mater Society President Paul Williams leads a large group of students down Douglas Street protesting fees increase on 18 October 1965.

University of Victoria Alma Mater Society President Paul Williams leads a large group of students down Douglas Street protesting fees increase on 18 October 1965.

August 22 – October 15, 2012

Legacy Maltwood (at Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

This exhibition features a selection of historic and contemporary photographs of life at UVic over the past 50 years. Taken from Ian MacPherson’s book ‘Reaching Outward and Upward: The University of Victoria 1963-2013, this exhibit promises a vibrant look at the people, places and events that make our campus unique.

Mark Laver: Shining Examples

I Want to be a Shining Example, Mark Laver

I Want to be a Shining Example, Mark Laver

March 1 – March 31, 2012

Legacy Small Gallery

Dark, wet, Vancouver Island nights receive a painterly treatment in Mark Laver’s intimate Night Paintings and ambitious Rural Disasters.

Be it urban parks after midnight, trailer park fires, nocturnal car crashes or rural highways, the exhibit reveals a battle between the psychological and narrative power of nocturnal imagery and the allure of oil paint itself. Smeared, swirled, glazed and dripped, the luscious materiality of paint is as much the subject of these paintings as the landscape Laver calls home.

Similar Exhibitions

The Emergence of Architectural Modernism II (Victoria Modern Series)

Hubert Norbury, Bay Parkade Entry (1960)

Hubert Norbury, Bay Parkade Entry (1960)

The Emergence of Architectural Modernism II: UVic and the Victoria Regional Aesthetic in the Late 1950s and 60s

November 30, 2011 – February 26, 2012

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

It features a tour of 1950s and 60s UVic architecture, architect and designer biographies, and a free PDF of the catalogue.

This series of exhibitions and publication projects explores the relationships, personalities and projects contributing to the development of a regional modernist aesthetic in the post-war Victoria urban landscape (1939–2013). It celebrates and coincides with celebrating the 150th anniversary of the founding of the City of Victoria (2012) and 50th anniversary of the founding of the University of Victoria at its Gordon Head Campus.

During the late 50s and 60s, a small number of legacy architectural firms changed Victoria’s built environment with forward-looking planning and bold new architectural forms. Using plans, drawings, photographs and architectural models from the period, this exhibit explores a number of planning initiatives, design projects and building programs that defined this important phase in the development of the Capital Region.

This is the second in a series of exhibitions and publications exploring the relationships, personalities and projects contributing to the development of a regional modernist aesthetic in the postwar Victoria urban landscape. This exhibition develops themes of the earlier exhibition Town and Gown: Centennial Square and the Gordon Head Campus: Seminal Projects (2011).

Exhibition Catalogue: Victoria Modern 3: The Emergence of Architectural Modernism II; UVic and the Victoria Regional Aesthetic in the Late 1950s and 1960s (2011)

Similar Exhibitions:

Victoria Modern Series Catalogues:

Victoria Modern 1: Investigating Postwar Architecture and Design on Southern Vancouver Island: an introduction (2005)

Victoria Modern 2: From a Modern Time: The Architectural Photography of Hubert Norbury: Victoria in the 50s and 60s (2009)

Click here for the Victoria Modern website

K’ulut’a and the Professor: The Friendship of Henry Hunt and Peter Smart

Sea Otter Feast Bowl, Henry Hunt, painted red cedar, c. 1970s

Sea Otter Feast Bowl, Henry Hunt, painted red cedar, c. 1970s

October 8 – November 26, 2011

Legacy Small Gallery

Curated by Kevin Neary

View the online catalogue:

K’ulut’a and the Professor Catalogue

K’ulut’a and the Professor celebrates the art and legacy of famed Kwakiutl artist Henry Hunt (K’ulut’a was his name in Kwak’wala, the native language of the Kwakiutl people). Henry Hunt’s influential style and personality can be detected in thousands of artworks produced by himself and his many students and by their students in turn.

Henry Hunt did not divide life into compartments; he enjoyed the company of people from all walks of life. He formed a particularly strong friendship with Professor Peter Smart, a friendship that ultimately resulted in the donation of a most significant collection of Henry Hunt’s art to the University of Victoria Art Collections (UVAC) in 2003. The entire collection donated by Peter Smart is included in the current exhibit, supplemented by additional examples of Henry Hunt’s art from UVAC and by some of Peter Smart’s own carvings.

Images of Internment: Paintings by Dr. Henry Shimizu

Henry Shimizu, Painting #3
Henry Shimizu, Painting #3

November 19, 2011 – February 2, 2012

Legacy Maltwood (at Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

In 1999, Dr. Henry Shimizu created a series of oil paintings based on his life as a teenager in the New Denver Japanese Internment Camp, BC, from 1942 to 1946. Images of Internment is an attempt to highlight the activities and lifestyle of the internees in this camp; they are the memories of a teenager and his friends.

According to Shimizu, despite isolation from mainstream Canadian Society during this time, the development of young Japanese Canadians progressed in almost the same pattern as any other Canadian teenager. One would have thought that this internment experience would have embittered this group and led to widespread despair and depression. Instead, says Shimizu, they came away from the experience more determined to be successful Canadians, contrary to the intention of those who promoted and carried out this injustice of internment and exile.

Convergence/Divergence: Landscape and Identity on the West Coast

Head of Canada, Katherine Emma Maltwood, sandstone, 1912

Head of Canada, Katherine Emma Maltwood, sandstone, 1912

August 17 – October 1, 2011

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Caroline Riedel

View the online catalogue:

Convergence/Divergence Catalogue

Click here to read more about this show on the University of Victoria’s website.

This exhibition explores how a selection of artists from diverse cultural backgrounds respond to the West Coast landscape as a means of expressing identity, while also suggesting ways in which an artist’s identity provides a lens for presenting or interpreting landscape.

The works highlight contrasting artistic approaches and ways of relating to local landscapes, illustrating both First Nations and settler’s complex relationships to the places they live. Through a selection of prints, drawings, sculpture, paintings and mixed media works, this exhibit shows some of the many ways in which West Coast artists express identity in terms of a sense of self, place, or community.

The title of this exhibition refers at once to both commonalities in how people relate to, identify with, inhabit or “resonate” with a particular place (convergence) and the different ways artists see, experience, represent and interpret that place (divergence).

Salish Reflections

Susan Point, Symphony of Butterlies
Susan Point, Symphony of Butterlies

September 2011 – Present

Cornett Building, University of Victoria Campus

The online catalogue for Salish Reflections is available here. It features a self-guided art tour, numerous artworks and artist biographies.

As part of the renovations completed in the Fall of 2011, and with the generosity of George and Christiane Smyth, the Cornett Building has become an established centre for Coast Salish art. By displaying 26 artworks created by six Coast Salish artists, the University of Victoria and the Faculty of Social Sciences hopes to honour the history, customs, and culture of the Coast Salish, while inspiring student, faculty, and the greater community.

This installation has been named Salish Reflections for two reasons. Firstly, lessLIE’s piece Reflections has been used to decorate all exterior doors of Cornett, so it seemed fit to incorporate this important work even further. Secondly, the aim of the installation is to become more familiar with and reflect upon the Coast Salish art of our region. This website was created to be a destination for those wishing to learn more about Coast Salish peoples and their art.

“Now here’s the deal…” WAC Bennett’s Political Cartoons

December 8, 2010 – January 23, 2011

Legacy Small Gallery

In 1993 the Kelowna Museum acquired a number of articles belonging to the late William Andrew Cecil Bennett, Premier of British Columbia from 1975-1986. Among the collection were a number of political cartoons collected by or gifted to Bennett during his time in office and that had been hung in his home’s stairwell.

In the late 2000’s the show of thirty-three framed cartoons and a 45-minute film, The Good Life (1968), commissioned by Bennett’s Social Credit government toured galleries around British Columbia. It accompanied the Architecture and Power: The Legislative Buildings of Canada’s Capitals show here at the Legacy Art Gallery.