Category Archives: Online Projects

Exhibitions or artists with an online catalogue or exhibit on an external website.

There is Truth Here: Creativity and Resilience in Children’s Art from Indian Residential and Day Schools

photo_truth_here

Legacy Downtown – 630 Yates St.

September 23, 2017 to January 6, 2018

Guest curated by Dr. Andrea N. Walsh, Anthropology, UVic.

View the exhibition website here

There is Truth Here brings a new line to bear on the role of art as part of children’s knowledge, identity, and experiences of Indian Residential and Day Schools. Through paintings, drawings, sewing, beading, drumming, and singing, and drama produced by children and youth who attended them in British Columbia and Manitoba the exhibition seeks to contribute in vital and new ways to dialogues and initiative about true telling, reconciliation, and redress in Canada.

The first person perspectives of Survivors and former students, their families, and communities are told via children’s creativity to bring a multi-generational perspective on the lives of children in the schools. The exhibition explores the common thread of historical resilience in the creation of the artworks, and speaks to the importance of the art today as nodes of healing and resurgence.

Image: Courtesy of Osoyoos Museum Society.

Media: “Art of Innocence in Dark Times” Times Colonist | Galleries West First Nations children’s art, created at residential and day schools, opens pathways for healing and reconciliation“, Focus Magazine.

Programming

Panel Discussion & Public Celebration

Legacy Downtown | 630 Yates St. | September 30, 2017 | 2:30 – 5pm

Two back to back public events on Orange Shirt Day. A public celebration of the exhibition There Is Truth Here: Creativity and Resilience in Children’s Art from Indian Residential and Day Schools including welcoming speeches, a performance by A.N.S.W.E.R. drumming group (All Nations Strong Womyn for Education and Reconciliation), and refreshments and light food from Seefood Catering.

Public Celebration | 4 – 5pm | Panel Discussion | 2:30 – 4pm

Creative Acts: Art and Resilience in an Era of Reconciliation

Residential school Survivors, artists, students, and museum- based scholars will share their diverse range of experiences and perspectives on how creativity and art can be used as acts and forms of resilience. Set within the context of the exhibition There is Truth Here, the six panelists and moderator Dr. Andrea Walsh will explore how art in various forms in public spaces can be critical tools for change in the wake of Canada’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission and in the midst of the National Inquiry for Murdered and Missing Indigenous Women and Girls.

Panel Participants

Mark Atleo was born in 1952 in Tofino, British Columbia and he is a member of the Ahousaht First Nation. He grew up in Ahousaht with his mom, dad, and 9 siblings. At 8 years of age he began attendance at the Alberni Indian Residential School (AIRS) until the age of 16. In 1968 he moved to Victoria and finished his high school diploma at Oak Bay High School. In 2013 Mark joined the University of Victoria’s project to repatriate children’s art from the Alberni Indian Residential School after his own painting was returned to him at the National Event for Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Vancouver. Through his work with the University of Victoria research group, his story is now part of the permanent exhibition of residential school history in the new Canada Hall at the Canadian Museum of History. He continues to share his story with a personal goal of educating present and future generations about residential schools in Canada, and is a supporter of continued dialogue about the schools as a form of reconciliation.

Lindsay Delaronde is an Iroquois, Mohawk woman, born and raised on the Kahnawake reservation. She holds a BFA from the Emily Carr Institute of Art & Design and a MFA and a Masters of Counselling from the University of Victoria. In 2016 Legacy Art Gallery featured her exhibition IN DEFIANCE that challenged stereotypes of Indigenous women. She is currently the Indigenous Artist in Residence for the City of Victoria.

Dr. Jennifer C. Robinson has recently defended her PhD thesis in Visual Anthropology and Materiality in the Department of Anthropology at the University of Victoria. She holds an MA from University London, and has studied at University of British Columbia and Mount Royal University. She has won many academic awards including University of Victoria President’s Research Scholarship and Social Sciences & Humanities Research Council, Doctoral Fellowship. Her research is driven by her love of arts and culture, and by her belief that exhibitions, galleries, and museums can be spaces that create change. As a Visual Anthropologist, her research is focused on the diversity of Canadian culture.

Lorilee Wastasecoot is an Ininu iskwew (Cree woman) with roots in York Factory Cree Nation and Peguis First Nation in Manitoba. Lorilee grew up in Winnipeg, MB and respectfully acknowledges the Esquimalt and Songhees Nations on whose territory she currently resides. She is a recent Political Science graduate of the University of Victoria. In 2015, Lorilee and her family first became aware of a painting her father, James Wastasecoot, created in Robert Aller’s art class in Dauphin, MB at the Mackay Indian Residential School where her father spent 12 years of his life. Lorilee is a fourth generation inter-generational residential school survivor.

Gina Laing (Cootes) and her daughter April Laing are members of the Uchuklesaht First Nation, and their home community is Kildonan Reserve on the Alberni Inlet. Gina was a student of Robert Aller’s in the late 1950s and she has worked alongside her daughter April to use her childhood art, and experience of residential school to teach Canadians about this era of their country’s history. In 2015 they recorded the story of the repatriation of Gina’s childhood paintings from the Alberni Indian residential school from Gina’s perspective as a Survivor, and April’s perspective as an Intergenerational Survivor at the Canadian Museum of History. Gina’s painting and their story as mother and daughter now appear in the new Canada Hall at the national museum.

 

So Long, Frank Lloyd Wright

FLW_window_2

Legacy Downtown | 630 Yates St.
Inner Gallery

July 15 – September 16, 2017

Curated by Emerald Johnstone-Bedell

Exhibition website

After five decades of stewardship, the UVic Legacy Art Galleries is giving seven Frank Lloyd Wright designed windows back to the house they originated from. Say farewell to the art glass windows at our exhibition that celebrates this monumental gift during the 150th anniversary of the internationally renowned architect’s birth.

These original windows are intrinsic decorative and architectural parts of Wright’s unifying design principle called “organic architecture.” Wright was inspired by nature and natural materials to build harmonious designs that were integrated between their environment, architectural plan, fixtures and furniture.

The ‘light screens’, as Wright called them, were created in 1904-05 for the Darwin D. Martin House Complex in Buffalo, New York. In the wake of the Great Depression, the family house was abandoned and left in disrepair until recent renovations have restored the complex into a National Historic Landmark. These salvaged light screens are some of the last pieces needed to achieve Wright’s visionary intent and complete the major restoration project.

Event

FLW_windowPresentation & Discussion

Legacy Downtown | 630 Yates St.

September 16, 2017 | 3 – 5pm | Facebook Page

UVic Legacy Art Galleries’ return of Frank Lloyd Wright-designed windows back to their original home is a rare gesture of a museum transferring valuable objects out of their collection to serve a greater purpose.

Join us for a presentation by Director, Mary Jo Hughes and Darwin D. Martin House Curator, Susana Tejada as they discuss how UVic’s windows contribute to the restoration of a Frank Lloyd Wright-designed home in Buffalo, New York.

Hughes will speak to the intent of the gallery’s decision and the significance of returning the windows to the context designed for them. Tejada will present the history of the Darwin D. Martin House and recent restoration achievements, while emphasizing how the original windows will have a lasting impact on Frank Lloyd Wright’s legacy.

This event falls on the final day of the So Long, Frank Lloyd Wright exhibition and will be the last opportunity for the community to say goodbye to the windows.

MartinHouseDirector Susana Tejada is Curator of Frank Lloyd Wright’s Darwin D. Martin House where she oversees exhibitions, interpretation, and scholarly programs for this National Historic Landmark—a multi-residential estate admired for its six signature buildings, interior and exterior gardens, and an extraordinary collection of art glass and furnishings. Prior to her appointment in 2012, Susana served in various capacities in the fields of museum, archives, and library administration and has held professional positions at the Albright-Knox Art Gallery, the State University of New York at Buffalo, and New York State’s Documentary Heritage Program. Susana was an invited participant in The Getty’s prestigious Next Generation Leadership Institute, an executive education program for the art museum field’s top emerging talent. She holds a Master’s degree from the University of Michigan and a duel Bachelor of Arts in Art History and Medieval and Renaissance Studies from New York University. She is a native of Los Angeles.

MJHughesMary Jo Hughes is the Director of the University of Victoria Art Legacy Art Galleries. From 2007 to 2012 she was Chief Curator at the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria. She has served as Senior Curator athe Winnipeg Art Gallery and Associate Curator at the Agnes Etherington Art Centre in Kingston Ontario. Mary Jo Completed her MA in Art History at Queens University, with a specialization in Canadian art history, and has taught at the University of Winnipeg and the University of Manitoba.

The Mystery of Grafton Tyler Brown: Race, Art, and Landscape in 19th Century British Columbia

January 21 to April 1, 2017

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown – Inner Gallery | 630 Yates Street

Guest curated by Dr. John Lutz (History, UVic) with Emerald Johnstone Bedell and Caroline Riedel.

Exhibition Catalogue here

We know Grafton Tyler Brown (1841-1918) was one of the first professional landscape artists to work in the Pacific Northwest. His few regional paintings that survive offer vivid windows into the world of 1880s Victoria and British Columbia. Yet, how did this African American artist succeed at a time when racial prejudice prevented most Blacks from entering any skilled profession?


Image credit: Portrait of Artist Grafton Tyler Brown, Image A-08775 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

EVENTS & PROGRAMS

Curator’s Talk with Guest Lecture

February 4 | 3 – 4:30pm *Light Refreshments Provided

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown  | 630 Yates Street

Kick-off Black History Month with an afternoon presentation about BC’s first Black professional artist with UVic History Department Chair John Lutz and writer, Robert J. Chandler. Facebook Event Page 

 

Performance

March 10 | 7 – 9pm *Light Refreshments Provided

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown
630 Yates Street

TOPIC: Re-Imagining Race, Art, and Landscape

Three local artists, Charles Campbell, Kemi Craig and Ann-Bernice Thomas respond to the story of Grafton Tyler Brown, BC’s first Black professional artist. Part of Ideafest. Facebook Event Page

Generously supported by the British Columbia Arts Council

 

Ellen Neel: The First Woman Totem Pole Carver

January 14 to April 1, 2017

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown  | 630 Yates Street

Curated by the Williams Legacy Chair Dr. Carolyn Butler Palmer with advising curators David A. Neel and Lou-ann Neel

This exhibition celebrates the career of Kwagiulth (Kwakwaka’wakw) carver Ellen Neel (1916-1966), the first woman carver of monumental totem poles. Further, it acknowledges Neel’s influential role as a professional artist and her contribution towards the recognition of what Neel called “Indian Art”. “Our art continues to live, for not only is it part and parcel of us, but can be a powerful factor in combining the best part of Indian culture with the fabric of a truly Canadian art form.” – Ellen Neel

Image credit: Kakasolas (Ellen Neel), carved and painted cedar mask by David A. Neel (photograph by Katie Hughes. On loan from Camosun College, Department of Visual Arts.

EVENTS

EllenNeelLecture

Feb. 22 | 5 – 6pm *limited seating

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown  | 630 Yates Street

Distinguished Women Scholar Lecture Series

TOPIC: “I Want to Call Their Names in Resistance”: Claiming Space for Indigenous Women in Canadian Art History.

Dr. Sherry Farrell Racette, Professor, artist & curator. Presented by the Department of Art History and Visual Studies.

Facebook Event Page

The Averted Eye Sees: The Life and Work of Glenn Howarth – Part II

 

October 15, 2016 to January 7, 2017

Curated by Jenelle Pasiechnik (UVic MA, 2015)
With supervision from Caroline Riedel (Legacy Art Galleries)

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown | 630 Yates Street

Exhibition Website

Glenn Howarth was a pillar in Victoria’s arts scene from the late 1970s until his death in 2009. He also had an enduring connection to the University of Victoria — as a Visual Arts student in the 1960s, a sessional instructor, an artist-in-residence with the Engineering Department, and recently with a bequest of his archival papers and digital art. Howarth was an innovative creator and inspired teacher searching for ways to communicate the artistic process and the perceptual functions of the eye and brain that contribute to visual perception. His work was often infused with surrealistic imagery which recalls the work of Francis Bacon. Howarth was also responsible for innovations in computer graphic art in the early 1980s working on the Telidon system as an artist in residence at UVic’s Engineering Department with Dr. Ernest Chang. He represented Canada with this work in the Sao Paulo Biennale and at Expo 86.

The Averted Eye Sees draws on UVic’s significant collection of Howarth paintings primarily from the Michael C. Williams estate, as well as Howarth’s writing, sketches, ephemera, and digital archive, part of the regional artists archive initiative of UVic Libraries Special Collections and Archives. It also includes a fascinating case study on the challenges of ‘retro-computing’ in recreating Howarth’s early experiments in digital artwork.

Due to the popularity of the exhibition on campus this summer, a second edition of this exhibition will be featured in the small gallery downtown, allowing for the viewing of a larger selection of Howarth’s powerful oeuvre.

IN DEFIANCE with artist/collaborator –  Lindsay Delaronde

October 8, 2016 to January 7, 2017

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown | 630 Yates Street

Exhibition Catalogue here

The exhibition premiering at the University of Victoria’s Legacy Art Gallery Downtown, IN DEFIANCE emerges from Iroquois Mohawk artist Lindsay Delaronde’s photographic project entitledSquaw. This project, in utter defiance to that negative word long often used to denigrate Indigenous women, seeks to break down the stereotypes. These individual portraits dismantle the negative stereotypes of First Nations women by allowing the individuals to portray themselves more authentically reflecting truth of diversity, power, and respect.


Celebration Event

Friday October 21, 7-9 pm

 

In Conversation with Lindsay Delaronde & Sarah Hunt

Saturday, October 22, 2-4 pm *Light Refreshments Provided

Join us “In Conversation” with artist Lindsay Katsitsakatste Delaronde (Iroquois/Mohawk) and Sarah Hunt (Kwagiulth), Assistant Professor of Critical Indigenous Geographies to explore this in depth photographic project through various artistic, social and political lenses.

This event was recorded – to watch the video, click here

Mask Making with Lindsay Delaronde

Sunday, Nov 6, 2016 1-4 pm

Inspired by the courageous women who expose their inner worlds through self-portraits in the exhibition, In Defiance, artist Lindsay Delaronde, will facilitate a safe and creative environment to explore hidden aspects of ourselves that may have been oppressed by dominant culture and societal norms. Make a mask that shows your external persona and your hidden self. The workshop will begin with a discussion in the exhibition with the artist.

Cornhusk Doll Making with Lindsay Delaronde  

Sunday, Nov 20, 2016 1-4 pm

Facilitated by artist Lindsay Delaronde, as a group we will discuss identity and life experience in light of 33 self-portraits by Indigenous women in the exhibition, In Defiance. Using the discussion as a jumping off point, we will make corn husk dolls as an expression of our essential identities. Learn how the tradition of corn-husk doll making can be used in contemporary contexts to assert personal agency.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WITH GENEROUS SUPPORT FROM:

Image credit: Lindsay Delaronde, Kelly Aguirre.

The Averted Eye Sees: The Life and Work of Glenn Howarth

 

poster-final
July 30, 2016 to October 23, 2016

Curated by Jenelle Pasiechnik (UVic MA, 2015)
With supervision from Caroline Riedel (Legacy Art Galleries)

Legacy Maltwood (at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

Exhibition Website

Glenn Howarth was a pillar in Victoria’s arts scene from the late 1970s until his death in 2009. He was an innovative creator and inspired teacher searching for ways to communicate the artistic process and the perceptual functions of the eye and brain that contribute to visual perception. He was also responsible for innovations in computer graphic art in the early 1980s working on the Telidon system as an artist in residence in the Engineering Department at the University of Victoria campus with Dr. Ernest Chang. In 1983 he represented Canada in the Sao Paulo Biennale with some of this work and also presented it locally at  the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria and UVic’s Maltwood Art Museum and Gallery.

The Averted Eye Sees draws on UVic’s significant collection of Howarth paintings from the Michael C. Williams estate, as well as Howarth’s writing, sketches, ephemera, and digital archive, part of the regional artists archive initiative of UVic Libraries Special Collections and Archives. It also includes a fascinating case study on the challenges of ‘retro-computing’ in recreating Howarth’s early experiments in  digital artwork.

 

Curator’s Tour + Reception

The Averted Eye Sees: The Life and Work of Glenn Howarth

October 7, 3:30-5pm

Free & open to the Public

Room 027 – Legacy Maltwood (at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

Join us for a curator’s tour and special showing of archival materials to celebrate local artist and educator Glenn Howarth and his lifelong obsession with visual perception. The exhibition includes paintings, drawings, prints and Howarth’s pioneering work in digital art (recently restored by the UVic Libraries), for which he received international recognition at the 1983 Sao Paulo Biennale and at Expo 86. Highlights of Howarth’s extensive personal archive including journals, letters, sketches and photographs will be seen at this one-time event. Reception to follow.

Guest curator Jenelle M. Pasechnik was the recipient of the 2015 Margaret Russell Graduate Internship in Curatorial Studies, which supports the preservation of art created by BC artists.

img_3453

Beauty for All: The Arts & Crafts Movement in Europe and North America

 

posterOctober 3 – January 9, 2016

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown 630 Yates Street

Curated by Holly Cecil

To view the exhibition catalogue, click here.

An exhibition and film project at UVic’s Legacy Art Gallery features work by some of the best-known designers of the time: William Morris, C.R. Ashbee, the Roycroft Workshops, Tiffany Studios, Frank Lloyd Wright, Edward Burne-Jones, and Liberty and Co., all from the nationally recognized permanent collection at the University of Victoria.The exhibition demonstrates founder William Morris’s belief in a return to simplicity, and that beautiful, well- made objects in the home could promote a better life for both the user and the maker:”If you want a golden rule that will fit everybody, this is it: “Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful or believe to be beautiful.“- William Morris, 1880.

To check out the Arts and Crafts Movement Film Project, click here

poster Rack Card

Magna Mater: Katharine Maltwood and the Arts & Crafts Movement

poster

October 8, 2015 – January 9, 2016

Small Gallery

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown 630 Yates Street

Curated by Caroline Riedel

To view the exhibition catalogue, click here.

In 1911, Katharine Maltwood presented her first critically acclaimed sculpture, commissioned for the Roycroft Institute, one of the most important communal craft workshops of the North American Arts and Crafts Movement. Entitled Magna Mater, this piece was installed on the grounds of their headquarters in East Aurora, New York and was intended as a visual embodiment of the ideals held by some of the major proponents of the American Arts and Crafts Movement.

This exhibition investigates the role of the prevailing Arts and Crafts Movement in late 19th century Britain in Maltwood’s art, her research and” discovery” of the Glastonbury Zodiac, her art collecting interests, and subsequently how her bequest defined the collecting priorities of the University of Victoria for the next decade. Indirectly her life’s work helped to build one of the finest Arts and Crafts collections in the country and visitors will have the opportunity to learn more about this highly regarded sculptor’s work.

To check out the Arts and Crafts Movement Film Project, click here

posterRack Card

unlimited edition

poster final with canada logoJuly 4 – September 26, 2015

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown 630 Yates Street

unlimited edition is organized by the Kamloops Art Gallery.

Curated by Tania Willard (Secwepemc), Aboriginal Curator in Residence, Kamloops Art Gallery

To view the exhibition catalogue, click here.

Kenojuak Ashevak, Inuit | Carl Beam, Ojibwe | Robert Davidson, Haida | Charles Greul | Chuuchkamalathnii, Nuu-chah-nulth | Mark Henderson, Kwakwaka’wakw | Richard Hunt, Kwakwaka’wakw | Ellen Neel, Kwakwaka’wakw | Pudlo Pudlat, Inuit | Daphne Odjig, Odawa-Potawatomi | Walter J Phillips | Bill Reid, Haida | Chief Henry Speck, Kwakwaka’wakw | Art Thompson, Nuu-chah-nulth | Art Wilson, Gitsxan
With artists from the University of Victoria Art Collection: Doug Cranmer, Kwakwaka’wakw | Joe David, Nuu-chah-nulth | Stan Greene, Coast Salish | Roy Henry Vickers, Tsimshian Haida heilstuk | Susan Point, Coast Salish
unlimited edition attempts to construct an art historical framework that looks at how prints by Aboriginal and Inuit artists represented in the Kamloops Art Gallery’s permanent collection, supplemented by works on loan from the Carleton University Art Gallery and Legacy Art Galleries, represent a drive to preserve, portray and popularize oral histories and address social inequities in the medium of printmaking. Featuring prints from Northwest Coast, Woodlands and Inuit artists with a focus on an early period of printmaking in the 50s through to the 70s, unlimited edition showcases prints that relate to ideas of cultural story, politics of land, and the beauty of Indigenous aesthetics.

Image Spirit Owl, Kenojuak Ashevak (Inuit), from Kenojuak Lithography series, 1979

CURATOR’S TALK /// Saturday, September 26, 2pm | Legacy Art Gallery Downtown 630 Yates Street /// Free & open to the public

This project is funded in part by the Government of Canada.

gov of canada logo

poster final with canada logo
Rack Card with gov logoRack Card side 2

Karl Spreitz: Self-Propelled

Exhibition PosterMarch 7 – July 26, 2015

Extented to August 16, 2015

Legacy Maltwood (at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library) 

Click here for online exhibition

Curated by Naomi Shields and Emerald Johnstone-Bedell

Self-Propelled showcases Spreitz’s wide-reaching range of photography, films, and book and magazine publications, as well as his friendships and connections to other Victoria artists.

Spreitz uses whimsy and paradoxical imagery to challenge the conventions of mundane life. This self-driven, multi-talented connoisseur developed an authentic artistic style that echoes his character and life experiences. Anti-authority satire, human mechanization, and formal compositions derive from his Austrian upbringing, athletic training, and film and photography career. This selective retrospect presents various artwork, film, photographs and ephemera documenting Spreitz’s life and cultural contributions.

Image Exhibition Poster

Digital sign final Rack Card revised date Spreitz Poster

Similar Exhibitions:

Making A Scene! Victoria’s Artists in the 1960s

Gods of the Sun Dogs, Margaret Ellen, c. 1960

Gods of the Sun Dogs, Margaret Ellen, c. 1960

April 2 – June 27, 2015

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown

Curated by Emerald Johnstone-Bedell

The 1960s marked the emergence of a vibrant contemporary art scene in Victoria. Events such as the BC centennial celebrations and Expo ’67 foregrounded regional and national artistic production, and the newly formed Canada Council for the Arts around a source of financial support to practicing artists. The politically charged spirit of the time, born out of war experiences and social justice movements, generated a desire for change and experimentation. This included artistic movements towards anti-hierarchial approaches inclusive of applied and non-Western art.

This show brought together ceramics, film, printmaking, painting, and sculpture to give visitors a glimpse of what the art scene of the 1960s would have looked like. Making a Scene! also highlighted the importance of growing institutions and movements of the 60s like the budding University of Victoria Art Collection, the birth of the Limners group, and the establishment of rights for First Nations artists.

View the exhibition website here

movie night poster

 

final Rack Card

 

 

poster working

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Similar Exhibitions: