Author Archives: khughes

Victoria Modern: Architectural Modernism Resource

Survival by Design: Contemporary photographs by John Taylor & documents from the Pacific North West Architectural Archive, University of Victoria (2017)

First conceived in 2005, Victoria Modern is a catalogue series about the history and photography of modern architecture in the City of Victoria and at the University of Victoria.

Gathered on this website are online catalogues, relevant exhibition histories, and archived online projects, all related to Victoria’s architectural modernism movement.

Click here to visit the project website here

The series is the work of Martin Segger, professor and former Director of the University of Victoria Legacy Art Galleries.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Survival by Design

Survival by Design 

The Legacy of Early Modern architecture in Victoria

Guest curated by Martin Segger
Contemporary photographs by John Taylor & documents from the Pacific North West Architectural Archive, University of Victoria

Exhibition catalogue click here

This exhibition is part of a series – Victoria Modern – click here to view the Victoria Modern series website

TWO EXHIBITIONS – TWO LOCATIONS

Survival by Design: The Legacy of Early Modern architecture in Victoria in the Urban Landscape

April 19 to July 8, 2017

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown Inner Gallery | 630 Yates Street

Survival by Design: The Legacy of Early Modern architecture in Victoria: the UVic Gordon Head Campus

May 6 to Oct 8, 2017

Legacy Maltwood (at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

The two decades post-WWII saw some of the most intensive urban development Victoria has witnessed. The result, a flowering of design innovation by a small group of architectural, has created a built heritage which, still under appreciated, nevertheless still defines the look and feel of Victoria.

Initiatives such as Centennial Square and the UVic Gordon Head Campus, planned neighbourhoods to accommodate returning veterans, to commercial and residential high-rises, this “legacy”; building stock still defines the urban landscape, influences how we use it, and to a large part determines how we adapt and change it.

These two exhibits document this unique and creative architectural legacy, captured through the lens of architectural photographer, John Taylor.

As small group of local architectural practices, often working together, created a distinctive design approach to style and form, but working within the earlier 20th tradition of the European-influenced “International Style”. As regional influences coalesced, what we know today as a “West Coast Style” emerged.

Form and detail uniquely expressed not only the purpose and function of these buildings, along with climate, geography and materials availability, but also demonstrated how building traditions of the region were subsumed in new construction technologies.

Taylors’s images document adaption and change in the urban landscape as original designs have responded to the pressures architectural life cycles: changes in purpose, retrofits to meet modern life-safety and other codes, additions to accommodate growth. Archival evidence, drawing from plans, photographs and textual records, traces the original design intent of the builders. Some of the reasons and subsequent design approaches for both structural and cosmetic adjustments to built form and detail are also revealed.

This exhibition project is supported by a grant from the Canada Council of the Arts.

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Event | Public Talk

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown | 630 Yates Street

Thursday, May 11th, 2017 | 7pm

Public talk by guest curator Martin Segger

Survival by Design: the Legacy of Early Modern Architecture in Victoria

Facebook Event Page

Join us for a lecture with guest curator Martin Segger. Survival by Design: the Legacy of Early Modern Architecture in Victoria Prof. Martin Segger’s talk will focus on a series of iconic Victoria buildings which defined a new urban landscape in the 1950s and 6Os. Illustrated by contemporary photographs by John Taylor and supplemented by textual and visual sources from the Architectural Archives of the Pacific Northwest at UVic, Prof. Segger explores the design origins and traditions represented by this much-neglected part of the City’s architectural heritage and examines the process of adaptation and change which has either enhanced or compromised the design intent which prompted their original construction.

Image credit: McPherson Library, UVic. Photo by John Taylor.

 

Learning Through Looking: Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Art History and Visual Studies at UVic

February 4 to April 13, 2017

Legacy Maltwood (at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

Curated by faculty members with graduate students Jaiya Anka and Atri Hatef

Using diverse historical and contemporary cultural objects, members of the Department of Art History & Visual Studies show how history, learning, and community interweave to support the mission to teach inter-cultural understanding through the study of world arts.

Image credit: EVA CAMPBELL, UNTITLED, 1992-93, MIXED MEDIA & OIL ON CANVAS. FACULTY OF GRADUATE STUDIES

 

LearningThroughLooking

Event Panel Discussion

March 8 | 5 – 7pm | Rm. 025 | Mearns Centre – McPherson Library

TOPIC: Why Art Matters in Dangerous Times

We live in a visual world where images define our lives. Yet, are we in danger of taking the visual for granted? This lively panel discussion argues that with xenophobia, ethnocentrism, and censorship on the rise, art has more to offer society than ever before in human history. The panel accompanies the exhibition “Learning Through Looking – Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Department of Art History & Visual Studies at the University of Victoria.” Part of Ideafest.

 

The Mystery of Grafton Tyler Brown: Race, Art, and Landscape in 19th Century British Columbia

January 21 to April 1, 2017

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown – Inner Gallery | 630 Yates Street

Guest curated by Dr. John Lutz (History, UVic) with Emerald Johnstone Bedell and Caroline Riedel.

Exhibition Catalogue here

We know Grafton Tyler Brown (1841-1918) was one of the first professional landscape artists to work in the Pacific Northwest. His few regional paintings that survive offer vivid windows into the world of 1880s Victoria and British Columbia. Yet, how did this African American artist succeed at a time when racial prejudice prevented most Blacks from entering any skilled profession?


Image credit: Portrait of Artist Grafton Tyler Brown, Image A-08775 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

EVENTS & PROGRAMS

Curator’s Talk with Guest Lecture

February 4 | 3 – 4:30pm *Light Refreshments Provided

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown  | 630 Yates Street

Kick-off Black History Month with an afternoon presentation about BC’s first Black professional artist with UVic History Department Chair John Lutz and writer, Robert J. Chandler. Facebook Event Page 

 

Performance

March 10 | 7 – 9pm *Light Refreshments Provided

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown
630 Yates Street

TOPIC: Re-Imagining Race, Art, and Landscape

Three local artists, Charles Campbell, Kemi Craig and Ann-Bernice Thomas respond to the story of Grafton Tyler Brown, BC’s first Black professional artist. Part of Ideafest. Facebook Event Page

Generously supported by the British Columbia Arts Council

 

Ellen Neel: The First Woman Totem Pole Carver

January 14 to April 1, 2017

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown  | 630 Yates Street

Curated by the Williams Legacy Chair Dr. Carolyn Butler Palmer with advising curators David A. Neel and Lou-ann Neel

Gallery Guide here

This exhibition celebrates the career of Kwagiulth (Kwakwaka’wakw) carver Ellen Neel (1916-1966), the first woman carver of monumental totem poles. Further, it acknowledges Neel’s influential role as a professional artist and her contribution towards the recognition of what Neel called “Indian Art”. “Our art continues to live, for not only is it part and parcel of us, but can be a powerful factor in combining the best part of Indian culture with the fabric of a truly Canadian art form.” – Ellen Neel

Image credit: Kakasolas (Ellen Neel), carved and painted cedar mask by David A. Neel (photograph by Katie Hughes. On loan from Camosun College, Department of Visual Arts.

EVENTS

EllenNeelLecture

Feb. 22 | 5 – 6pm *limited seating

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown  | 630 Yates Street

Distinguished Women Scholar Lecture Series

TOPIC: “I Want to Call Their Names in Resistance”: Claiming Space for Indigenous Women in Canadian Art History.

Dr. Sherry Farrell Racette, Professor, artist & curator. Presented by the Department of Art History and Visual Studies.

Facebook Event Page

The Averted Eye Sees: The Life and Work of Glenn Howarth – Part II

 

October 15, 2016 to January 7, 2017

Curated by Jenelle Pasiechnik (UVic MA, 2015)
With supervision from Caroline Riedel (Legacy Art Galleries)

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown | 630 Yates Street

Exhibition Website

Glenn Howarth was a pillar in Victoria’s arts scene from the late 1970s until his death in 2009. He also had an enduring connection to the University of Victoria — as a Visual Arts student in the 1960s, a sessional instructor, an artist-in-residence with the Engineering Department, and recently with a bequest of his archival papers and digital art. Howarth was an innovative creator and inspired teacher searching for ways to communicate the artistic process and the perceptual functions of the eye and brain that contribute to visual perception. His work was often infused with surrealistic imagery which recalls the work of Francis Bacon. Howarth was also responsible for innovations in computer graphic art in the early 1980s working on the Telidon system as an artist in residence at UVic’s Engineering Department with Dr. Ernest Chang. He represented Canada with this work in the Sao Paulo Biennale and at Expo 86.

The Averted Eye Sees draws on UVic’s significant collection of Howarth paintings primarily from the Michael C. Williams estate, as well as Howarth’s writing, sketches, ephemera, and digital archive, part of the regional artists archive initiative of UVic Libraries Special Collections and Archives. It also includes a fascinating case study on the challenges of ‘retro-computing’ in recreating Howarth’s early experiments in digital artwork.

Due to the popularity of the exhibition on campus this summer, a second edition of this exhibition will be featured in the small gallery downtown, allowing for the viewing of a larger selection of Howarth’s powerful oeuvre.

IN DEFIANCE with artist/collaborator –  Lindsay Delaronde

October 8, 2016 to January 7, 2017

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown | 630 Yates Street

Exhibition Catalogue here

The exhibition premiering at the University of Victoria’s Legacy Art Gallery Downtown, IN DEFIANCE emerges from Iroquois Mohawk artist Lindsay Delaronde’s photographic project entitledSquaw. This project, in utter defiance to that negative word long often used to denigrate Indigenous women, seeks to break down the stereotypes. These individual portraits dismantle the negative stereotypes of First Nations women by allowing the individuals to portray themselves more authentically reflecting truth of diversity, power, and respect.


Celebration Event

Friday October 21, 7-9 pm

 

In Conversation with Lindsay Delaronde & Sarah Hunt

Saturday, October 22, 2-4 pm *Light Refreshments Provided

Join us “In Conversation” with artist Lindsay Katsitsakatste Delaronde (Iroquois/Mohawk) and Sarah Hunt (Kwagiulth), Assistant Professor of Critical Indigenous Geographies to explore this in depth photographic project through various artistic, social and political lenses.

This event was recorded – to watch the video, click here

Mask Making with Lindsay Delaronde

Sunday, Nov 6, 2016 1-4 pm

Inspired by the courageous women who expose their inner worlds through self-portraits in the exhibition, In Defiance, artist Lindsay Delaronde, will facilitate a safe and creative environment to explore hidden aspects of ourselves that may have been oppressed by dominant culture and societal norms. Make a mask that shows your external persona and your hidden self. The workshop will begin with a discussion in the exhibition with the artist.

Cornhusk Doll Making with Lindsay Delaronde  

Sunday, Nov 20, 2016 1-4 pm

Facilitated by artist Lindsay Delaronde, as a group we will discuss identity and life experience in light of 33 self-portraits by Indigenous women in the exhibition, In Defiance. Using the discussion as a jumping off point, we will make corn husk dolls as an expression of our essential identities. Learn how the tradition of corn-husk doll making can be used in contemporary contexts to assert personal agency.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

WITH GENEROUS SUPPORT FROM:

Image credit: Lindsay Delaronde, Kelly Aguirre.

The Averted Eye Sees: The Life and Work of Glenn Howarth

 

poster-final
July 30, 2016 to October 23, 2016

Curated by Jenelle Pasiechnik (UVic MA, 2015)
With supervision from Caroline Riedel (Legacy Art Galleries)

Legacy Maltwood (at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

Exhibition Website

Glenn Howarth was a pillar in Victoria’s arts scene from the late 1970s until his death in 2009. He was an innovative creator and inspired teacher searching for ways to communicate the artistic process and the perceptual functions of the eye and brain that contribute to visual perception. He was also responsible for innovations in computer graphic art in the early 1980s working on the Telidon system as an artist in residence in the Engineering Department at the University of Victoria campus with Dr. Ernest Chang. In 1983 he represented Canada in the Sao Paulo Biennale with some of this work and also presented it locally at  the Art Gallery of Greater Victoria and UVic’s Maltwood Art Museum and Gallery.

The Averted Eye Sees draws on UVic’s significant collection of Howarth paintings from the Michael C. Williams estate, as well as Howarth’s writing, sketches, ephemera, and digital archive, part of the regional artists archive initiative of UVic Libraries Special Collections and Archives. It also includes a fascinating case study on the challenges of ‘retro-computing’ in recreating Howarth’s early experiments in  digital artwork.

 

Curator’s Tour + Reception

The Averted Eye Sees: The Life and Work of Glenn Howarth

October 7, 3:30-5pm

Free & open to the Public

Room 027 – Legacy Maltwood (at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

Join us for a curator’s tour and special showing of archival materials to celebrate local artist and educator Glenn Howarth and his lifelong obsession with visual perception. The exhibition includes paintings, drawings, prints and Howarth’s pioneering work in digital art (recently restored by the UVic Libraries), for which he received international recognition at the 1983 Sao Paulo Biennale and at Expo 86. Highlights of Howarth’s extensive personal archive including journals, letters, sketches and photographs will be seen at this one-time event. Reception to follow.

Guest curator Jenelle M. Pasechnik was the recipient of the 2015 Margaret Russell Graduate Internship in Curatorial Studies, which supports the preservation of art created by BC artists.

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Out of the Frame: Salish Printmaking

poster-workingJune 8 to October 1, 2016

In collaboration with Wachiay Studio (Andy McDougall) and curated by Dr. Andrea N. Walsh.

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown | 630 Yates Street

Featuring work by Charles Elliott, Doug LaFortune, Angela Marston, Andy Everson, Maynard Johnny Jr., lessLIE, Chris Paul, and Dylan Thomas.

Coast Salish artists challenge ideas about printmaking by bringing the process of printing into relation with cultural traditions, personal experiences and the material world.

View the exhibition website here

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Celebration Event + Artist Roundtable

Out of the Frame: Salish Printmaking

Food + Refreshments Provided
Free + open to the public | *Please note seating is limited.

September 24, 1 – 4pm | Legacy Art Gallery Downtown | 630 Yates Street

An afternoon event featuring an artist roundtable discussion with the artists from Out of the Frame: Salish Printmaking on the role of printmaking in their practices and new directions for printing taken up in the exhibition. Discussion will be moderated by curator, Dr. Andrea Walsh. Featuring a guest talk reflecting on the production of prints by Salish artists given by independent scholar India Rael Young.

1-2pm – Welcome + talk by India Rael Young “The Visual Vernacular in a World of Prints”
2-2:15pm – Break – light refreshments
2:15-3:15pm – Artist roundtable
3:15–4pm – Celebration with the Tzinquaw Dancers

Out of the Frame artists are: Charles Elliott, Doug LaFortune, Angela Marston, Andy Everson, Maynard Johnny Jr., lessLIE, Chris Paul, and Dylan Thomas

India Rael Young is an Andrew W. Mellon Dissertation Fellow in Art History at the University of New Mexico. Young’s research addresses the history of contemporary Native and First Nations prints from the Northwest Coast. More broadly, Young’s interests lie in North American print media, and emerging modes of reproduction. Her curatorship and writing negotiate feminist, post-colonial, and critical race frameworks to expose the complex web of cultural underpinnings in the North American art world.

New Book Histories Publishers, Printers and Presses

NEWBookHistoriesFebruary 19 – extended to June 26, 2016

This exhibition is curated by the students in English 500 (Textual Studies and Methods of Research), under the supervision of instructor Dr. Janelle Jenstad.

Legacy Maltwood (at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

Book histories often focus on authors and readers. Yet publishers and printers play key roles in both the art and business of book production. This includes the material form and aesthetics of the book, the acquisition of rights, the shaping of the text, editorial history, and canon formation. Showcasing materials from the University of Victoria Special Collections and University Archives, this exhibition traces the role of publishers and printers in literary history from early production in scriptoria to 21st-century BC small presses. Come learn how early publishers remade the codex in the sixteenth century, who owned and regulated the right to print, how 18th-century printers made Shakespeare, what drove Dickens to become his own publisher, how Lady Chatterley’s Lover escaped the censors, why serial publication mattered, and how literary archives shed light on relationships between publishers and authors.

Image Metal type, Special Collections and University Archives, UVic Libraries, photograph by John Frederick.

Emerging Through the Fog : Tsa-qwa-supp and Tlehpik – Together

FINAL posterFebruary 13, to May 28, 2016

Curated by Hjalmer Wenstob | With supervisory guidance from Williams Legacy Chair, Dr. Carolyn Butler-Palmer

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown 630 Yates Street
This is an exhibition of two Nuu-chah-nulth men, “Fog-God” Art Thompson from Ditidaht (1948-2003) and Hjalmer Wenstob from Tla-o-qui-aht. Two artists, two friends. Two lives together.

Featuring the prints and paintings of Art Thompson/Tsa-qwa-supp from the collection of the Legacy Art Galleries and interactive carvings by contemporary artist Hjalmer Wenstob/Tlehpik, whose work is inspired by and resonates with that of his teacher and friend Tsa-qwa-supp. Tsa-qwa-supp taught for many years and inspired a number of artists who continue his work in this day.

Emerging Through The Fog seeks to honour and commemorate the life and work of the dedicated teacher Tsa-qwa-supp on the occasion of Tlehpik’s B.F.A from the University of Victoria’s Visual Arts Department. We invite you to join us in celebrating the life of Tsa-qwa-supp, an inspiring and caring teacher.

Image (detail), Tlehpika, Hjalmer Wenstob.
INVITATION

Celebrating W.B. Yeats at 150

poster closing event August 22, extended to February 14, 2016

Curated by the University of Victoria’s Special Collections and Archives staff

Legacy Maltwood (at the Mearns Centre – McPherson Library)

2015 marks 150 years since the birth of Irish poet and Nobel laureate William Butler Yeats. This exhibit explores Yeats’ work as a poet and playwright with artwork, rare books, and printed ephemera drawn from the Legacy Gallery and Special Collections and University Archives. The exhibition also features unique items documenting the artistry of his family, including father John Butler Yeats, brother Jack Butler Yeats, and sisters Susan Mary Yeats (Lily) and Elizabeth Corbet Yeats (Lollie), all of whom were noted artists.

Yeats 2015 Facebook Page /// Offical Yeats 2015 Site

Closing Reception

The Legacy of W.B. Yeats

Join CBC Host and UVic Chancellor Shelagh Rogers for a panel discussion exploring the enduring legacy of Irish poet W.B. Yeats.

Thursday, January 28th, 4pm-5:30pm
Room 129 Mearns Centre for Learning– McPherson Library
On the University of Victoria CAMPUS

Free & open to the public.

This event is the closing reception for the Celebrating Yeats at 150 exhibition at the Legacy Maltwood Gallery.

Image Exhibition Poster. Portrait of W.B. Yeats by his brother Jack Yeats from Mosada: A Dramatic Poem (Dublin: Printed by Scaly, Bryers and Walker, 1886).