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Message from the Director, Mary Jo Hughes

Mary Jo Hughes, Director

It’s always a good year at UVic’s Legacy Art Galleries! And it’s always a great place to visit when you need to rise above the fray of the outside world. Here, you will find our programming for Canada 150 celebrates the diversity that we uphold in our country.

2017 has begun on a high note at Legacy Downtown with two exhibitions - Ellen Neel: The First Woman Totem Pole Carver and The Mystery of Grafton Tyler Brown. The first exhibition, curated by the Williams Legacy Chair, Dr. Carolyn Butler Palmer, gives insight into the significant artistic and cultural contributions of Kwagiulth artist Ellen Neel. It also offers the opportunity to celebrate how the traditions and talents she demonstrated have been passed on to her children and grandchildren. Through the second exhibition and its public programs we are introduced to Grafton Tyler Brown who is purported to be the first black artist to live and work in Victoria. In it, we explore his rarely seen landscapes of British Columbia and consider how race played into his practice and success as a professional artist.

Don’t forget that there is more to see on campus to brighten your winter days. Opening in February at Legacy Maltwood in the McPherson Library is the exhibition Learning Through Looking. This celebrates the 50th Anniversary of the Art History and Visual Studies department and the diversity of teaching and research it contributes to our understanding of the world through cultural objects.

Also, we have some great public programs planned in conjunction with Black History Month, UVic’s Ideafest, and Distinguished Women Scholars Lecture Series.

We look forward to welcoming you soon.

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EXHIBITIONS

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown | 630 Yates Street | Wed - Sat 10 - 4pm | 250.721.6562

ELLEN NEEL

The First Woman Totem Pole Carver 

January 14 to April 1 2017

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown 630 Yates St.

This exhibition celebrates the career of Kwagiulth (Kwakwaka'wakw) carver Ellen Neel (1916-1966), the first woman carver of monumental totem poles. Further, it acknowledges Neel’s influential role as a professional artist and her contribution towards the recognition of what Neel called “Indian Art”. “Our art continues to live, for not only is it part and parcel of us, but can be a powerful factor in combining the best part of Indian culture with the fabric of a truly Canadian art form.” – Ellen Neel

“Our art continues to live, for not only is it part and parcel of us, but can be a powerful factor in combining the best part of Indian culture with the fabric of a truly Canadian art form.” – Ellen Neel

Curated by the Williams Legacy Chair Dr. Carolyn Butler Palmer (Associate Professor, Art History and Visual Studies) with advising curators David A. Neel and Lou-ann Neel.

EVENT Feb. 22 / 5 - 6pm | Distinguished Women Scholar Lecture Series | *limited seating

TOPIC: “I Want to Call Their Names in Resistance”: Claiming Space for Indigenous Women in Canadian Art History.

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown 630 Yates St.

Dr. Sherry Farrell RacetteProfessor, artist & curator. Presented by the Department of Art History and Visual Studies.

 

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The Mystery of Grafton Tyler Brown

Race, Art, and Landscape in 19th Century British Columbia

January 21 to April 1, 2017

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown 630 Yates St.

We know Grafton Tyler Brown (1841-1918) was one of the first professional landscape artists to work in the Pacific Northwest. His few regional paintings that survive offer vivid windows into the world of 1880s Victoria and British Columbia. Yet, how did this African American artist succeed at a time when racial prejudice prevented most Blacks from entering any skilled profession?

Guest curated by Dr. John Lutz (History, UVic) with Emerald Johnstone Bedell and Caroline Riedel.

Image credit: Portrait of Artist Grafton Tyler Brown, Image A-08775 courtesy of the Royal BC Museum and Archives

EVENT Feb. 4 / 3 - 4:30pm | Curator Talk & Guest Speaker

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown 630 Yates St.

With The Mystery of Grafton Tyler Brown curator Dr. John Lutz and writer Robert J. Chandler

Kick-off Black History month with an afternoon presentation about BC’s first Black professional artist with UVic History Department Chair John Lutz and writer, Robert Chandler.

Facebook Event Page

EVENT Mar. 10 / 7 - 9pm | Performance

TOPIC: Re-Imagining Race, Art, and Landscape

Legacy Art Gallery Downtown 630 Yates St.

Three local artists, Charles Campbell, Kemi Craig and Ann-Bernice Thomas respond to the story of Grafton Tyler Brown, BC’s first Black professional artist.

Facebook Event Page | Part of Ideafest.

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EXHIBITIONS

Legacy Maltwood - On Campus (at Mearns Centre - McPherson Library) | Hours | 250.721.6562

Learning Through Looking

Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of Art History and Visual Studies at UVic

February 4 to April 13, 2017

Legacy Maltwood - On Campus (at Mearns Centre - McPherson Library)

Using diverse historical and contemporary cultural objects, members of the Department of Art History & Visual Studies show how history, learning, and community interweave to support the mission to teach inter-cultural understanding through the study of world arts.

Curated by faculty members with graduate students Jaiya Anka and Atri Hatef

Image credit: Image design by Cliff Haman

EVENT Mar. 8 / 5 - 7pm | Panel Discussion

TOPIC: Why Art Matters in Dangerous Times

Mearns Centre – McPherson Library | Room 025

We live in a visual world where images define our lives. Yet, are we in danger of taking the visual for granted? This lively panel discussion argues that with xenophobia, ethnocentrism, and censorship on the rise, art has more to offer society than ever before in human history. The panel accompanies the exhibition "Learning Through Looking - Celebrating the 50th Anniversary of the Department of Art History & Visual Studies at the University of Victoria."

Part of Ideafest.

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Continuance

Frank Lloyd Wright’s Theories of Organic Architecture in the Designs of Samuel Maclure and John DiCastri

Until January, 29 2017

Legacy Maltwood - On Campus (at Mearns Centre - McPherson Library)

Local architects Samuel Maclure (1860-1929) and John Di Castri (1924-2005) shaped Victoria’s cityscape in distinct ways and their structures reflect two very different eras and design aesthetics in our city’s history. This exhibition features selected designs by Di Castri and Maclure and compares them to the theories of organic architecture articulated by world–renowned architect Frank Lloyd Wright. Through a careful selection of architectural commissions, this exhibition demonstrates the similar aesthetics and philosophies shared by all three architects.

Curated by Josie Greenhill (Art History and Visual Studies) with supervision by Caroline Riedel and Mary Jo Hughes (Legacy Art Galleries)

Image credit: Exhibition Poster - Architect: John Di Castri, Dunsmuir Residence Interior, 1951.

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Donors make a difference!

Help support the future of the collection, exhibitions, facilities, and community-based research initiatives. For more info contact Curator of Collections, Caroline Riedel e-mail 250.472.5619 

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LEGACY ART GALLERY Downtown | 630 YATES ST. | VICTORIA BC, CANADA | V8W 1K9